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Thread: E3 process?

  1. #11
    raucousimages's Avatar
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    If I remember right E3 had some wierd steps like re-exposure to light and hardening of the emulsion. Not the sort of thing to be done at home. Also labs won't process E3 in E6 or C41 processors. They dont care about your film, They care about what non C41/E6 film will do to their chemicals. This is why some labs will not process film you bulk load yourself. E1,2,3,4,5 and 6 are not just refinements of the same process they are different processes.
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    Dave;

    There was E1 (not named that - just Ektachrome process chemicals) in the 50s, and E2 and E3 in the 60s and 70s. Then E4 in the 70s and E6 in the 80s. The E1 and E2 ran at 75 deg F, the E3 and E4 ran at 85 deg F (IIRC), and E6 runs at 100 deg F.

    I still have instruction sheets for all of them around here somewhere.

    PE
    Stephanie:

    If you want to see an example of E2 process work, check PE's gallery

    Matt

  3. #13

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    I believe that the Dignan Newsletter, published during the 70's, gave the formulas for the various solutions used in the E3 process. The Newsletter is available on microfiche and could probably be gotten on interlibrary loan.

  4. #14
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    I just remembered that all of the E3 process chemistry (I think it is for E3 motion picture) is published on the EK web site as VNF3. You can look it up there.

    Matt;

    That is old stuff done in 1961 and 1962. The E2 is fading, but the E3 is holding up quite well.

    PE

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by raucousimages
    If I remember right E3 had some wierd steps like re-exposure to light and hardening of the emulsion. Not the sort of thing to be done at home. Also labs won't process E3 in E6 or C41 processors. They dont care about your film, They care about what non C41/E6 film will do to their chemicals. This is why some labs will not process film you bulk load yourself. E1,2,3,4,5 and 6 are not just refinements of the same process they are different processes.
    One or more of the early processes used a chrome alum hardener for step 2 after the MQ developer.

    If any of the earlier Ektachromes is processed in E6, the emulsion will come off the support and ruin the processing solutions.

    If anyone is interested, I'll look these up after my workshop. I don't have time right now to do it.

    PE

  6. #16
    Helen B's Avatar
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    E-3 and E-4 formulae are given in old BJP Annuals as well. If anyone is interested I could copy them. The E-4 formulae include some exotic ingredients but the lower temperature E-3 process is comparatively straightforward. The E-3 process will work for E-4 materials.

    Best,
    Helen

  7. #17
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B
    E-3 and E-4 formulae are given in old BJP Annuals as well. If anyone is interested I could copy them. The E-4 formulae include some exotic ingredients but the lower temperature E-3 process is comparatively straightforward. The E-3 process will work for E-4 materials.

    Best,
    Helen
    Yes, E4 used t-butyl amine borane as reversing agent, and a derivative of succinaldehyde as prehardener.

    You can substitute a light re-exposure for the TBAB, and plain succinaldehyde for the special derivative.

    The neutralizer used hydroxylamine sulfate. There is no substitute.

    I'm not sure E3 will work for E4 products. The 'conventional wisdom' that I was taught was NO, but I never saw proof either way.

    PE

  8. #18
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    I suppose I'll just have to forget about it. Anyone want it to give it a go?
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie Brim
    I got my Agfa camera from Evilbay today and found out that the shutter is stuck...no big deal. I can get that fixed. However, the exciting and rather cool thing is that there was a roll of film inside: Kodak E3 slide film. Does anyone know of a lab that still does this film or a place that I can go to get it developed? I'm excited to see what's on it.
    1) Keep the roll as is as a shelf piece.
    2) Or throw it away and save your money, whatever was there is gone.
    Don Bryant

  10. #20
    raucousimages's Avatar
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    Won't Rodinol work????

    Sorry, had to say it.

    Good luck with the camera though. A lot of us have old rolls sitting on shelves.
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

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