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Thread: E3 process?

  1. #21

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    Back in the '70's, I worked in a lab developing E-3, E-4, and E=6. E-5 was and I think still is for the development of some of the specialized ektachromes. E-3 was, at that point in time, a professional process. It gave much better results than E=4. I don't recall developing any 35mm ektachrome via E-3, only 2 1/4 through 8x10. It did involve a re-exposure with a 250 watt bulb. The E-4 used a chemical re-exposure instead. E-3 was a fine process. If I recall, E-3 and E-4 were in no way compatible, chemically. Possibly at different temps. as well. The film for E-3 was always marked as being professional. E-4 was a crap process. The chemicals were very dangerous and the processed film tends to fade in 5 to 10 years, even if it has been kept in the dark and seldom projected. E-3 is much better in that respect. E-6 is much better still. I remember Agfachrome and Kodachrome having better blacks than E-4. There were two bright spots vis the E-4 process: one was Infrared film and the other was named, I think, Photomicrografy film. It was ASA16 and needed some serious green/cyan filtration as well. It was a higher contrast than any other color trans film at the time. Popular or Modern Photography tested it as being sharper than Kodachrome II ! Alas, all those brittally sharp and marvelously saturated slides and 4x5 chromes are faded past use.

  2. #22
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    One other thing that may make this film worthless is the degradation of the layers. Old Ektachrome usually show a shift to the red because the cyan (I think) layer degrades faster than the magenta and the yellow one. I suppose that if it applies to developped film, it applies even more to undevelopped film? But as was pointed out, you might try to develop the silver only to have some kind of B&W neg.
    Using film since before it was hip.


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  3. #23
    Philippe-Georges's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie Brim
    I don't just want to toss it, though. Hm. I suppose that I could pick up a color press kit from somewhere and do that...I may not get anything worth beans, but I'd at least have the peace of mind that I wasn't just going to toss a roll of film that could have something interesting on it.
    Who killed J.F.K.?

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  4. #24
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    Film Rescue International in Canada will try to develop it as black-and-white negatives. That's your only reasonable hope at getting usable images. No charge if they don't get anything, but expensive if they do.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

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  5. #25
    raucousimages's Avatar
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    Film Rescue International? I love the name. I have a vision of a team of surgeons in a clean room removing the film from an old K-1000 as it sits on life support with a guy holding a tray standing ready to rush the recovered film to the darkroom.
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

  6. #26
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    Trying to get images off of old film is always fun.

    Definetely, do NOT run this through C-41 or E-6, the 100 - 104 degree temperature of C-41 will melt the emulsion off and result in a helluva mess inside the processor.

    Why not try processing it a black and white? Lot's of people have good luck with Rodinal on slide films; I've had good results with thatn and D-76 on 70's and '80s era E-6 films.

    What about processing it in a C-41 or E-6 color developer at a lower temperature? Would that give any results?

  7. #27

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    The only film I can remember that used E-3 was Ektachrome Professional from the 1960s. The process was related to E-4, but not the same. That means it required benzyl alcohol or a similar solvent in the color developer to release the couplers. It can not be processed in E-6 (or C-41) chemicals. As I recall, it could be processed in E-4 as a one-shot only, with somewhat inferior results, but I don't know what modifications to the process were needed. Incidentally, Ektachrome Professional was an outstanding film. I believe it was only available in 120.

  8. #28
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    I'll try running it through Rodinal stand...I have no clue what to even start it as to times, so a stand development procedure may be a good way to go. Another thing I could do is use Diafine to develop it. What say you, peanut gallery?
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  9. #29
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    Let us know howo this comes out; old films are always soooo exciting.

    Just make sure that you process a smaller piece of the film first so that you can adjust the times for the rest of it.

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