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Thread: E3 process?

  1. #1
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    E3 process?

    I got my Agfa camera from Evilbay today and found out that the shutter is stuck...no big deal. I can get that fixed. However, the exciting and rather cool thing is that there was a roll of film inside: Kodak E3 slide film. Does anyone know of a lab that still does this film or a place that I can go to get it developed? I'm excited to see what's on it.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

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    raucousimages's Avatar
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    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

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    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    rockymountainfilm.com is going to be your only chance..My god E3 is so freaking old, I would be surprised if there is anything left on the base to develop...be aware, rocky is darn expensive and it could be many months before they even run the film...

    By the way, does it say E3 on the canister???? because up until the 70's I thought most slide film was a K process

    Dave

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    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Dave;

    There was E1 (not named that - just Ektachrome process chemicals) in the 50s, and E2 and E3 in the 60s and 70s. Then E4 in the 70s and E6 in the 80s. The E1 and E2 ran at 75 deg F, the E3 and E4 ran at 85 deg F (IIRC), and E6 runs at 100 deg F.

    I still have instruction sheets for all of them around here somewhere.

    PE

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    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    Dave;

    There was E1 (not named that - just Ektachrome process chemicals) in the 50s, and E2 and E3 in the 60s and 70s. Then E4 in the 70s and E6 in the 80s. The E1 and E2 ran at 75 deg F, the E3 and E4 ran at 85 deg F (IIRC), and E6 runs at 100 deg F.

    I still have instruction sheets for all of them around here somewhere.

    PE
    Hi Ron,

    I was hoping you would post, going back that far is a bit beyond my expertice...

    Hope things are well.

    By the way, and I know your as busy as I am, but did you ever install your screen? and if you did what did you think of it?



    Dave

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    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    If I felt confident doing slide processing at home I'd actually buy some chemicals and try it, but I don't. I could have the one hour place develop it in C41, but I'm afraid that cross processing a film this old will ruin it. It may not come out anyway. I'll see what Rocky Mountain will charge me and weigh the cost VS reward thing.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  7. #7
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Your chances of getting anything worth while is virtually nill, you have to remember the millions of pictures and the few that really mean something...I would plan on at least $50 bucks from RMF and it could take a year or more.

    Dave

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    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    I don't just want to toss it, though. Hm. I suppose that I could pick up a color press kit from somewhere and do that...I may not get anything worth beans, but I'd at least have the peace of mind that I wasn't just going to toss a roll of film that could have something interesting on it.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  9. #9
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Stephanie, you have a PM

    Dave

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    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    Oh, and the shutter isn't stuck, I've found. The mechanism for setting it off is just off, but I can still trip the shutter. I have to figure out a way to get it back ON...then I'll have a camera that works the way it should. It isn't a pretty camera...there's some wear on the outside and it looks as though it spent some time around some water because it's rusted where you open the film door, but the bellows appear as new (almost, which means they've likely been replaced) and the lens seems to have no real marks on it at all. I paid about $14 for this camera. I think I got a bargain.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

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