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  1. #11
    Willie Jan's Avatar
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    it sounds strange but often it is cheaper to buy it in the usa than in england for me...
    besides that i regulary buy stuff from freestylephoto along with other guys to split the shipping costs. For example the fuji across 100 film (120 format) is 1 euro cheaper than overhere. The tetenal e6 kit costs 23 pound, that is something like 37 euro, but the arista kit costs $20 = 16 euro....

  2. #12

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    Jobo chemicals = Fuji Hunt, they supply a lot of minilabs in Europe.
    Tetenal E6 is 3 bath, not with all E-6 films 100% compatible.

  3. #13
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    Home-processed E-6 is easy to do. The main advantage is turnaround - you can shoot film, process it immediately to check results, and then shoot more film, all in the same day.

    Economics is a consideration, and the key consideration is the exhaustion rate of the chemicals. The kits that I am familiar with were rated for 6x36 rolls of film, and if process six rolls the cost per roll was significantly less than commercial processing.. You could process six at once (you could - I wouldn't!), or you could process three batches, two rolls per batch, by extending the first developer a bit for the second and third batches to compensate for partial exhaustion. The problem is that shelf life of the working solutions is only about 30 days. If you aren't shooting a lot of film, its possible that the chemicals can become exhausted through age before they have been depleted by use, and in that case the cost of processing may exceed the cost of commercial processing.
    Louie

  4. #14
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willie Jan
    Thanks james.

    Are there any (large) differences between the developers of e6?
    There are differences, the Kodak and Fuji (I believe) both have proprietary formulations. However, the differences are so small, most people can't see the difference. I'm sure Photo Engineer will see this thread and elobate much more than I can.

    As for processing E6, I used to do my own all the time, but I used a Jobo processor. Quite easy to process.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #15

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    I understand that 4x5 film can be processed in a Jobo processor or combiplan tank etc. but what about 8x10 E6 and C-41?

    Tom.

  6. #16
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kershaw
    I understand that 4x5 film can be processed in a Jobo processor or combiplan tank etc. but what about 8x10 E6 and C-41?
    I believe I mentioned larger films five or six posts up in this thread?
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  7. #17

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    I've used both Paterson Chrome-6 and Kodak E-6 kits. The Paterson was a 3-bath kit that was easy to use but it went bad fairly quickly. (The instructions claimed you could put two or three rolls through each solution, IIRC, but I always got poor results with the second roll, probably because the developer had gone bad by the time I processed it a few days later. Either the first or second developer -- I don't recall which -- turned very dark after a while so I ended up ditching about half the kit.) The Kodak kit is harder to use because it's more chemicals, all of which require mixing and dilution prior to use, so there's a lot of prep time involved. Aside from this issue, though, it's not particularly tricky to use, just a bit tedious to set up. Kodak advertises their kit as being for one-shot use, and that's the way I've been using it. I've had it for longer than I've had the Paterson kit, and so far it's still good, so I'd say the Kodak kit's shelf life (for unmixed chemistry, anyhow) is longer.

    The Paterson kit is out of stock everywhere (AFAIK) at the moment because of Paterson's recent production problems. I don't know if they plan to bring it back when they get those problems sorted out.

  8. #18
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Have a good, accurate thermometer and use a water bath as temperatures are very critical. Watch your times and agitation to keep everything consistant. And then enjoy.
    Long before I had an enlarger, I started out in photography doing E-4 in a two-reel stainless steel tank in my basement. It is nice to see the slides that you shot in the afternoon that evening.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  9. #19
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    I just started doing my own E6 in a JOBO this summer, it is very easy in the JOBO. I use Kodak one shot chemistry, a 5 liter kit is $50 and you can mix just enough of the concentrates to run the film you have. All films have come out perfectly so far. Its really nice not having to depend on a lab anymore! Besides they all closed up in my area, I didn't have much choice. Lots of used JOBOs on EBAY.

    Jamieson
    Keep Film Alive, Shoot Everyday!
    JamiesInfraredPhotography.com

  10. #20

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    I've processed many 4x5 chrome films in Expert Drums on the Jobo with Tetenal chemistry. Very straightforward and the film comes out fine. As a matter of fact, unless you use a lab that processes E-6 in a "dip-n-dunk" system, rather than roller transport, you'll find home processed in the Jobo is better than most labs.

    Good luck!
    Regards,
    Alan Huntley
    www.silverscapephoto.com

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