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  1. #1
    6x6x9's Avatar
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    EFKE arschrome 100???

    Dear APUG members,
    Since I'm new in photography, recently I've faced one serious problem; two weeks ago, at the local flea market, I've bought 20 diapositive films for 1$. It expired in 1989. It's written "efke arschrome 100" on it, without any process informations nor suggestions. Immediately, I loaded my camera with that particular film, and after finishing it, brought it to the photo store to develop it. Next day they told me that they are not able to develop it because it needs different process, not standard E6. A guy who has been working for them in 1980's told me that arschrome was lounched on the market just before "Univerzijada '87" (student olimpic games in Zagreb 1987) and it was some kind of efke's market strategy. He couldn't recall which process was used to develop that film.

    So, is there any known process for "efke arschrome 100"?
    Beside that, I have one roll of Kodak Ectachrome (120 format). Could I face the same problem with Kodak?
    Thank you for your time and advices.
    PS: sorry for the confusion, I know I'm not accurate when I'm write in english

  2. #2
    juan's Avatar
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    zdravo 6x6x9
    I can't answer the Efke question, but the Ektachrome should be standard E-6. You might check with your lab before you expose it.

    Your English is fine. Much better than my Hrvatski.
    juan

  3. #3
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    If the Ektachrome's newer than the mid to late 1970s, it's almost certainly E-6. It could be E-4; it'll say on the package somewhere.

  4. #4

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    There also were other proprietary reversal chemistries/processes at the time. Agfachrome CT-18 was such a proprietary process. It's possible there were other films, such as Efke, that were based on that process. If so, there's no hope of getting it processed properly, though it could be cross-processed in C-41 chemistry. The results would be weird at best, and useless at worst.

    BTW, I liked CT18 better than anything except Kodachrome.
    Honey, I promise no more searching eBay for cameras.

  5. #5
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Earlier products will not go through modern processes due to the temperature.

    Don't process old color films in modern processes (general rule) as they are too soft.

    PE

  6. #6
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    I can certainly understand why the name was not successful!

  7. #7
    DBP
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Caulfield View Post
    I can certainly understand why the name was not successful!
    Looking back, I am sure sales bottomed out rather quickly.

  8. #8
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    That would have been a bummer for all concerned.

  9. #9
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    Earlier products will not go through modern processes due to the temperature.

    Don't process old color films in modern processes (general rule) as they are too soft.
    True, but you could always hand-process it at a lower temperature

  10. #10
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    That film might require one of the old Agfachrom/Agfacolor based colour diapositive processes that became prevalent in Eastern Europe. One such process is ORWO 9165.

    The processing temperatures used by "modern" E6 is much higher than what is used by ORWO 9165: E6 is at 38 C and ORWO used an average of 25 C. Not only that- the Agfa and Kodak colour processing systems used different chemicals with equally different reactions to create the colour dyes. Lowering temperatures is not enough. I would also speculate that the couplers in the emulsion of an Agfacolor based film may not react to a chromogenic Kodak colour developer to form colour dyes.

    Jay
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    "不管黑猫白猫能抓到老鼠就是好猫。" 邓小平
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