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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    i just finished doing some research and i think i am going to invest in the changing bag with the tent pole feature. i would rather pay for that then lightproof my entire bathroom lol.
    thanks again for all the info. you guys are getting me going in the right direction.
    *i hope* lol

  2. #12

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    May 2005
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    Woonsocket, RI USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by htmlguru4242 View Post
    Its really a good idea to do some printing; it gives you a greater understanding of the art, science and technique of photography. On a personal side of that, I shot just B&W negs. for about a year, and never printed. I found out when I started printing that my negatives were WAYY too high in contrast and density. It was only after having EXREME difficulty printing some normal shots that I found this out and adjusted my development / exposure accordingly.
    This is sound advice. I, too, started without an enlarger; I just scanned my first few rolls of film. Personally, I lucked out; most of my initial rolls were developed to a reasonable degree. I was getting increasingly nervous over the possibility that I'd have problems printing, though. Film scanners tend to do a better job with extremely dense or extremely thin negatives than does photographic paper, in my experience. (At least, that's true of my Konica-Minolta DiMAGE Scan Elite 5400 scanner.)

    If you can't print, at least get ahold of some reference negatives that are properly developed, or give some of yours to somebody who can judge the matter. You can then compare the densities (or have the "somebody" do this for you), which should help you get in the right ballpark.

    Quote Originally Posted by htmlguru4242
    That said, printing equpiment (read: enlarger) can be a tad expensive (i was using one at school).
    This is true if you buy a good and new enlarger, or even some high-end used ones. A good basic to mid-range enlarger, though, can be had for under $100 used on eBay. I got mine (a Philips PCS130 with PCS150 control unit) for $50 (plus $24 shipping). I've seen reports of people who pick up enlargers for free. The used market is glutted with equipment from people and organizations who are going digital, so prices have gone through the floor. If even $100 is too pricey for your budget, bide your time and watch for local deals; you might get one of those free ones or find one at a yard sale for $20 or something.

    Quote Originally Posted by bjjwannabe152
    i would rather pay for that then lightproof my entire bathroom lol.
    If the bathroom has no windows, lightproofing it is likely to be easy: A towel or shirt laid at the base of the door will probably be sufficient. If the door is particularly loose-fitting, some weatherstripping around the top and sides might be necessary, too. If the bathroom has windows, those would require more effort, but it can be done. You basically need something like a piece of wood, or perhaps even just cardboard, wrapped in black fabric, and cut to size, with flaps of fabric around the edges. Working at night can help a lot; even if your lightproofing is insufficient for blocking daylight, it might be more than enough to block moonlight, street lights, and whatever other nighttime lights exist outside the window.

  3. #13
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    Aug 2005
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    If the bathroom has no windows, lightproofing it is likely to be easy
    Definetely true, that's what I do every time I need to develop film.

    Its much easier to do this at night, as there's much less light that you have to deal with leaking in. It may be easier to get a changing bag though, so you can load the film in the tank anywhere. Do remember that once the film is in the sealed tank, there's no need to be in the dark.

    Good luck, once again

  4. #14

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    Feb 2006
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    I bought a film changing bag a while back from FreeStyle, but to be honest I never needed to use it yet (was more for travel ect). So this brings me to my question.

    I took it out and gave it a look over, and didn't really see how it could do a good job of keeping light out. I put my arms in the elastic arm-holes, but it still seemed like there might be some light coming in from the sides.

    If someone has the time to give a short explanation I would appreciate it.

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