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  1. #1
    Matt5791's Avatar
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    Old Colour Prints

    Over Christmas my mother produced a small wedding album full of colour prints from 1968 - apparently produced by a guest at the wedding, who must have been a keen amateur.

    They have very good colour, although there is some minor colour shift, more so in some than others. Really nice photographs considering the age.

    I was really wondering what sort of prints these might be.

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    Those would be the pre-RC color prints from Kodak, from standard color negatives. It was a process before Ektaprint 3, but can't remember the name. It had at least 5 chemicals, and took about 45 minutes. Prints were dried on a big drum dryer. No hot air drying, as this was fibre paper, and just like b/w baryta paper today, it would curl like crazy if not held tight against drying drum. I remember during that time, I worked for a studio that had a big Pako processing line for this paper in roll form. Had Nord enlargers with roll paper easels and cluster lens heads to make multiple prints at one exposure. The big Pako processor was built into a wall, as only the first steps of the process were in darkness. You went into a small room to load the paper. The larger room had the bulk of the processor, out in the light, including the big drum final stage for drying (face up), and the roll take up. After processing we took the roll out to a table with a cutter and sliced the roll into individual prints. I remember one time, due to incorrect drying temperature, the prints stuck to the drum. What a mess!!

  3. #3
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    At that time, they were probably Ektacolor 20, as that was the most prevalent paper being used in photofinishing labs for printing color negatives.

    If it was a professional, then it was probably Ektacolor Professional Paper.

    PE

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    The process was P-122, and the paper was probably RC, as RC was replacing Baryta in 1966. If it was FB baryta then it was Type 1910 or Ektacolor Professional (the name did not change with base for the pro version until Type 1970 or Ektacolor 70 professional.)

    PE

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    At that time, they were probably Ektacolor 20, as that was the most prevalent paper being used in photofinishing labs for printing color negatives.

    If it was a professional, then it was probably Ektacolor Professional Paper.

    PE
    The lab where I worked was attached to a bridal and portrait operation and only printed what they shot, so I am guessing it was Ektacolor Professional Paper. What was the chemical process called? for this paper. The OP talked about a wedding album of prints, so I am guessing it would be the same, rather than "snap-shots". I know the color negative film process they did was C-22, and they had a stainless steel Calumet sink-line for that.
    I remember the owner/photographer shot Hasselblads with the big Graflex strobes with the big high voltage battery packs that weighed a ton, for weddings. After film processing he would cut his negatives into individual frames and put each one in a glassine envelope. What a hassle to print all those negatives. My job was to make a 5x7 panalure print from every exposure on the bridal and engagement photos. Went through tons of fibre-based Panalure paper.

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    Thanks for the replies - very interesting.

    I dont have them to hand at present, but I was looking at them earlier today and I have to say I did not really think whether they were FB or RC - I was more interested in the colours.

    Thinking about it I think they may well have been FB - anyway I will somfirm this when I next see them.

    The person who shot them was a guest at the wedding and was not a professional photographer - so I guess he probably had them comercially processed on his behalf.

    I am planning on making some duplicates before the colour goes (which I guess in a another 40 years there will probably be substantial changes in the colour?)

    So which would be the best way to make dublicates? I was thinking scanning and then photoshop to amend the very slight colour change that has already occured, followed by RA4 prints.

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    I am planning on making some duplicates before the colour goes (which I guess in a another 40 years there will probably be substantial changes in the colour?)

    So which would be the best way to make dublicates? I was thinking scanning and then photoshop to amend the very slight colour change that has already occured, followed by RA4 prints.[/QUOTE]

    Unless you want to make a copy negaitve going with PS and R 4 is your best bet.

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    Do you have the negatives? I don't know if those negatives will work with today's RA4 paper but assuming they will it would be a choice. Assuming the negatives themselves haven't been damaged.

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    All color negatives from the 50s onward will work with Kodak paper, including unmasked old Agfa and Konica negatives. I have tested it. Fuji papers will not respond as well.

    PE

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    FWIW, I've been reprinting some family negatives from that era (all on Kodacolor film). I've been able to get color that's just fine (at least to my eyes) on both Konica and Agfa paper. I don't happen to have any Fuji paper at the moment, and my only Kodak RA-4 paper right now is in 11x14, which I'm not using for this project, so I've not used it, either. I have needed to use some odd filtration, though. I'm not sure if the negatives have faded or if the balance was odd originally. (I posted about this a while ago and PE mentioned a Kodak film of the time with a color balance in-between tungsten and daylight; it could be that.)

    My main point being that I can vouch for the ability to print negatives from the mid-to-late 1960s on modern RA-4 paper.

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