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  1. #11
    AgX
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    As indicated there are other ways to produce a random mosaic. Why not try the Agfa approach? With modern equipment this could be a project worthwhile.

  2. #12
    Struan Gray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    How about color photography from the 19th century?
    Now everyone will know I can't spell scoptopcitsdfsdidic. :-(

  3. #13

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    I seem to remember the first colour images, using a process based on dyed potato starch, were made in Edinburgh at the end of the 19th century. Quite why anyone felt the need to invent colour photography in that rather wet and grey city is another matter :-)

    David

  4. #14

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    Let's not forget that there were color photos made with "one-shot" cameras that took three b/w negatives at once, behind beamsplitter mirrors/color filters to achieve a b/w separation negative set of an original color scene. These were used extensively in advertising color photography in the 1920's and possibly before. National Geographic published Autochrome color images long before the 1920's.

  5. #15
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    About the time that the fine folks at Wratten distributed reliable panchromatic plates (early 20th c.) there were people already involved in making three-color carbon prints based on color separation negatives. It was an involved process, but it gave many good results (cue in the name of that Russian photographer we always mention but whose name I presently forget).

    Technicolor is a more well-known example of this method.

    If you read the Ctein article I linked to, you'll realize that Maxwell's color photo is actually an accident, because panchromatic sensitization did not exist yet.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  6. #16
    AgX
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    mhv,

    There were several techniques used in cinematography which were called Technicolor. The last and most famous one is an imbibition process. The carbo (or in this case rather a dyed wash-off-relief) process was employed in the second type of Technicolor processes.
    Last edited by AgX; 06-06-2007 at 06:04 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17

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    The first Technicolor, the 2 color process, was a technical nightmare that resulted in a film print that was a composite of two separate prints. I have only handled one such cemented print and it was in the final throes of decomposition.

    A fascinating, but highly convoluted process...

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    If you read the Ctein article I linked to, you'll realize that Maxwell's color photo is actually an accident, because panchromatic sensitization did not exist yet.
    Great story, isn't it? As I recall, Brian Coe was the first to explain it (though I may be misremembering and he was the first place I read it). Coincidental RGB peaks in blue and two different wavelengths of UV.

    Cheers,

    R.

  9. #19
    AgX
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    Kino,

    There was a first additive (though 2-colour) Technicolor process of 1916/17 based on two seperate films (which images were projected upon each other) before that bi-pack process.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Kino,

    There was a first additive (though 2-colour) Technicolor process of 1916/17 based on two seperate films (which images were projected upon each other) before that bi-pack process.
    Interesting. Sounds like a variation of Kinemacolor, although Kinemacolor predated it by several years.

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