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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim_walls View Post
    I've seen use of a blue 020 or 025 filter mentioned as well, although with no explanation why - I assume that's to correct the tungsten light source?
    From a color theory point of view, a blue filter is equivalent to a cyan filter plus a magenta filter. Since I don't know where you read that advice, I don't know what the reason was for it, but it could just be to simplify things -- if you need similar amounts of cyan and magenta filtration, substituting a blue filter of similar density might be a little easier. I'd think it would be more confusing when you're just starting out, though, so unless somebody suggests a compelling reason otherwise, I'd just stick with the standard cyan/magenta/yellow filters (or possibly an enlarger with an additive red/green/blue light source, but those are rare).

  2. #12
    Lopaka's Avatar
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    Ilfochrome gives a 'starting' filter on each batch of paper - but they don't specify the enlarger lamp color temp to which that applies. After some experimentation, you can figure out the 'enlarger factor' for your enlarger. My enlarger lamp is rated at 3300 K and comes pretty close - if yours is warmer (lower than 3300K) you may have to back off a bit on the yellow. Just takes a bit of fiddling until you figure it out.

    Bob
    "I always take a camera, That way I never have to say 'Gee, look at that - I wish I had a camera'" -Joe Clark, H.B.S.S.

  3. #13
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    Thanks for the advice everyone, you've saved me some money anyway! I've dropped the blue filter and cut down the range slightly and will see how I get on from there.

    Neal,
    Make your life easier and cheaper by starting your color printing experience with negative film. It is a bit easier to color balance when using slides as you have something to compare your print to, but the cost and ease of RA-4 make up for it. Search the forum for RA-4 tray processing.
    Genuinely, thanks for the advice but I think in my circumstances neg printing probably won't save me any money; yes, Ilfochrome paper is hellishly expensive, but on the other hand I develop all my own E6 by hand (so working with colour chemistry/temperature control etc. isn't something I'm concerned about.) If I were to switch to negs, I'd need to buy C41 chemistry as well as RA4, buy a load of film (I have a fridge full of E6 but no C41,) find a film I liked... etc. etc. etc. And I'd lose the best way of looking at the photos I took - projected on the wall :-).

  4. #14
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    Tim
    If you are already processing E6 by yourself , you will have no problem with Ciba, Just sorting out the filters. My advice put a colour chart in your room as quick reference of what colours when mixed will create what, or said differently if you remove a filter from your pack what will happen.
    I have been printing colour since 1975 and I still use a colour wheel at all my workstations*it is really critical for select colour enhancement when printing digitally*.
    Get a handle on what you need for a starting filter pack, then buy all the smaller increment filters. Also larger filters are great for colour/dodging/burning on cibachrome , but that is another can of whoopass that you will be able to overcome.
    As well Donald Miller here on APUG is a master of contrast/control , enhancement masks if I have ever seen one. He would be the go to guy for questions on controlling your image after you have gotten the basic colour and density issues sorted out.
    I encourage you to continue with this as you produce your own transparancies , now you will be able to control the whole process.
    have fun.
    Bob

    Quote Originally Posted by tim_walls View Post
    Thanks for the advice everyone, you've saved me some money anyway! I've dropped the blue filter and cut down the range slightly and will see how I get on from there.

    Neal,

    Genuinely, thanks for the advice but I think in my circumstances neg printing probably won't save me any money; yes, Ilfochrome paper is hellishly expensive, but on the other hand I develop all my own E6 by hand (so working with colour chemistry/temperature control etc. isn't something I'm concerned about.) If I were to switch to negs, I'd need to buy C41 chemistry as well as RA4, buy a load of film (I have a fridge full of E6 but no C41,) find a film I liked... etc. etc. etc. And I'd lose the best way of looking at the photos I took - projected on the wall :-).

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim_walls View Post
    And I'd lose the best way of looking at the photos I took - projected on the wall :-).
    I'm not really trying to convince you to go with negative film, but it is possible to make slides from negatives. There are a few commercial photofinishers who offer this service, and have for decades. I'm sure it could be done in a home darkroom, but I don't know offhand precisely what film you'd need or how it's processed. Of course, as it's a copy you'd lose a little quality, and it wouldn't look quite like whatever E-6 slide films you like.

  6. #16
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    Tim,
    Not much I can add here that Bob C. & and Bob L. haven't covered. All this experience in one place!
    I would suggest you start with some 8x10 while you get your feet wet.
    And when you find the chems, would you post where?
    Good luck new Ciba guy!
    DT

  7. #17
    tim_walls's Avatar
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    Great isn't it, Dave? How did people learn this stuff before the Internet & places like this?!

    Will definitely be starting with 8x10s - cost alone will dictate that! I put in an order for chems and paper with Silverprint last night, they're showing the P30 3x1l kit as available on their site. Of course, I'm also half expecting a phonecall on Monday to say they're having trouble sourcing it, so I'm just keeping my fingers crossed right now!

  8. #18

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    Doesn't Ilford offer a set of filters like Ciba used to? They came in two sizes, one large for above the film and one small for under the lens. Also, get the little book put out by Ciba about printing Cibachrome. (I'd bet there are APUG members who would contribute both of these just to help get you started.)
    It's all really pretty easy, just time consuming and relatively expensive.

  9. #19

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    KM Camera, NY has the filters in for i just bought some a few months
    ago.. PH # 800 343 9826.. I bought the 6 in. ones.. they can be cut.
    As far as the chems go ive been getting mine from Calumet
    (Bennsinvile) suburb of Chicago. They wont ship the 20l kits, i pick
    them up. But i think they will ship the 5l kits for they had them posted
    on the web site not long ago..I order from a guy named Roy,that is
    more than willing to provide me with anything i want..
    John

  10. #20
    tim_walls's Avatar
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    Well I finally did it...

    ...I just made my first Ilfochrome print. And I have a few observations...

    1. The label lied. The one that says 'emulsion side faces this label.' It lied, the swine. As I took the first sheet out of the pack I felt it and thought; hmm, that doesn't feel like the emulsion side, but everything I've read says you can't tell, so I'll trust the label. Grrr...

    2. Surprisingly, you can expose Ilfochrome through the base and still get an image. A very dark red image, granted, but an image nonetheless.

    3. Trying again the right way round, gosh, it's slow this stuff isn't it? I did test strips (8x10, f/8) at 20s, 40s, 60s and 80s - the difference between 40/60/80 was incredibly small.

    4. Finally, test strips done and wotnot, on the final print...

    ...wow, this stuff is gorgeous! I've never actually seen an Ilfochrome before trying it myself, only read about it - it's stunning! It has an almost metallic lustre about it and the colour just pops out!


    Anyway, thank you all for your help getting me this far - the only shame is that it's going to be a rather expensive habit... (My only other worry is that they keep making the damned stuff.)

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