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  1. #21
    Craig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tim_walls View Post
    1. The label lied. The one that says 'emulsion side faces this label.' It lied, the swine. As I took the first sheet out of the pack I felt it and thought; hmm, that doesn't feel like the emulsion side, but everything I've read says you can't tell,
    Yes, you can tell, and Ilford says so in their Cibachrome manual. They say to hold the paper close your ear and run your thumb over the surface. The back side will make a whispering noise, and the emulsion won't. It's noticable if you've got it upside down as soon as you start exposing the paper, as the back is white and the emulsion is a dark grey/brown I think.

    It is slow, several stops slower than Ilford Multigrade. Be aware that it shifts to yellow with long exposures. It's also red when wet, so you have to judge colour on a fully dry test strip. I pop mine in the microwave for a few seconds to help speed the drying. Too long (over 20s or so) and the steam created will bubble the emulsion.

    It is beautiful, but be careful if you're using the super gloss polyester base material. The emulsion is quite fragile when wet, and will scratch if you so much as look at it funny.

  2. #22
    tim_walls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Craig View Post
    Yes, you can tell, and Ilford says so in their Cibachrome manual. They say to hold the paper close your ear and run your thumb over the surface. The back side will make a whispering noise, and the emulsion won't. It's noticable if you've got it upside down as soon as you start exposing the paper, as the back is white and the emulsion is a dark grey/brown I think.
    Yeah, as soon as I saw it under the projector I figured "that's definitely not right." I assumed that given it's a bleaching process the emulsion would be as good as black. At least even if I do get it wrong again I'll know as soon as I put it under the enlarger and can save time/chemistry bothering to process it.

    It is slow, several stops slower than Ilford Multigrade. Be aware that it shifts to yellow with long exposures. It's also red when wet, so you have to judge colour on a fully dry test strip. I pop mine in the microwave for a few seconds to help speed the drying. Too long (over 20s or so) and the steam created will bubble the emulsion.
    Aha, that's good information on long exposures, thanks. I had read that it was more magenta when wet - obviously being the impatient type I took to my test strips with a hairdryer.

    That's how I learnt it's easy to make a mess of the emulsion . I shall try the microwave trick next time, thanks!

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