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  1. #1

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    Provia 100F speed question

    I just got back three rolls of Provia 100 120 that were badly blown out, all overexposed by at least a whole stop or more. I was shooting at the box rated speed. The only one that came out was one that was shot in kind of a dark location; I thought it would be underexposed but in fact looks pretty good. I haven't used this film before; most of my recent slide shooting has been Kodachrome. I don't think it was my light meter; I've used it with other films and cameras without difficulty. I don't think it's the camera (a Kowa 6), as I just processed a roll of Acros I shot just after the Provia, and the negs look spot-on exposure-wise. Should this film be rated at a slower speed? Or did I screw it up?

  2. #2
    JosBurke's Avatar
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    I've always used Provia rated at 100----it is my favorite slide film--never a problem. I'll be watching the replies myself as you've stirred my curiosity !
    Joseph Burke

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I rate it at 100 as well.

    I wouldn't make any judgments on the basis of your Acros exposure. B&W neg film can tolerate overexposure, while color slide film can't.

    I suspect it's a metering technique issue. Maybe if you posted a few shots and talk about your metering technique, you might get a few suggestions.
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  4. #4
    noseoil's Avatar
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    Spot meter highest value, add 1 1/2 stops, shoot. ASA 100. tim

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    I rate it at 100 as well.

    I wouldn't make any judgments on the basis of your Acros exposure. B&W neg film can tolerate overexposure, while color slide film can't.

    I suspect it's a metering technique issue. Maybe if you posted a few shots and talk about your metering technique, you might get a few suggestions.
    Unfortunately, I don't have a film scanner at the moment. I understand that slide film is less tolerant, but I've been using the same meter with Kodachrome and the Kodachrome comes out nice, in fact maybe a tad underexposed.

    The meter is a Gossen Luna Pro F, which I use with the spot attachment. Not a true spot, I know, but at least it lets me see what the meter is pointed at. I try not to have the highlights be more than +2 on the scale.

    I guess the next thing to try is to put a roll of Provia through one of my trusty Nikons, and see if that comes out any better.

  6. #6
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I'd try to put the highlights at about +1 or +1.5. +2 is going to be too much.
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  7. #7

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    I'll try that. Thanks for the feedback. Do you find that at that exposure level, it holds shadow detail okay?

  8. #8
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moopheus View Post
    I'll try that. Thanks for the feedback. Do you find that at that exposure level, it holds shadow detail okay?
    It depends upon the time of day and dynamic range.

    I would expect it is your metering technique rather than your camera or the film. Your meter may be getting fooled by the dark areas; hence the suggestion to meter the hightlights and open up.
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  9. #9

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    I have without exception found Provia 100F to expose nicely at 100 ISO. The problem is likely to lie in your metering technique or your equipment. Shooting a roll with your Nikon with the same meter/technique may rule out (or finger) the camera, but isn't certain in itself to pinpoint the problem.

    The usable dynamic range of this film is about five stops. If you're really exposing at two stops more than indicated by a spot for the brightest area in which you want to hold detail then I wouldn't expect this to result in gross over-exposure. If anything I'd expect a lot of black shadows in your contrastier scenes where I'd be expecting to use a grad to enable me to open up a bit more to achieve shadow detail. The beauty of a spot meter with slide film is the ability to measure scene brightness in relation to the capability of your film and check out where each important element in your composition is going to sit---which requires more than one reading. But whilst I don't think that "x stops more than highlight" is the best way to expose slide film it seems most unlikely to me that what you say you've done is the cause of this problem.

    I'd be inclined to try, with the Kowa and the Nikon, a few exposures of a near mid-tone like a high blue sky using the same Gossen and no adjustment to the reflective reading. If the result from each camera is the same and broadly correct then you have a metering technique problem though as I say I doubt this. If the sky is over-exposed with both cameras to about the same degree then you have a meter problem. If the sky is correctly exposed with the Nikon, but over with the Kowa then you have a camera problem.

    As indicated the wider dynamic range of b&w film may be hiding a relatively small error in exposure measurement or exposure delivery that will be quite sufficient to spoil your slide exposures.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Henderson View Post
    I If you're really exposing at two stops more than indicated by a spot for the brightest area in which you want to hold detail then I wouldn't expect this to result in gross over-exposure. If anything I'd expect a lot of black shadows in your contrastier scenes where I'd be expecting to use a grad to enable me to open up a bit more to achieve shadow detail.
    That is sometime what happens with the Kodachrome--in bright, very constrasty light, the shadows lack good detail, though in more diffuse light, such as a slightly cloudy day, it's fine. I've got three rolls here that I just shot with the same meter, and none of them look like the results I got with the Provia.

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