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  1. #11

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    I would think Astia 100F would be finer grained than any colour neg material, but I've never actually tested this. It certainly has extremely fine grain: noticeably finer than Velvia.

  2. #12
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    As far as Fujichrome transparency films, Astia I believe has an RMS granularity of 7 and Veliva 100 has an RMS granularity of 8. I am not sure of the granularity of the new Velvia 50 (old used to be 9) or the new Provia 100 films. Also, I do not know the granularity of the available Ektachrome films.

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  3. #13
    AgX
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    Most probably Ilford Micrographic. But deadslow and with a sensitivity cut-out...

  4. #14
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    Thanks of the response folks, the question relates to colour neg film. So there's no slow fine grin film out there? The new 160 films from Fuji and Kodak have got it sown up or have they?

  5. #15
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Kram, the new 160 negative films from both Kodak and Fuji have incredibly fine grain. Go for them.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  6. #16
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    Michel - I am using them at the moment. I am pleased with them but I was wondering is there anything finer than them?

  7. #17
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    In terms of available colour negative, my answer would be no.

    Some people have born-again experiences with secret stashes of Ektar 25, but I mean, for the price of uncovering such a trove in a worthwhile manner, moving up to 120 or LF is a better investment.

    I haven't yet been able to print 35mm 160 film on an 11x14, but I'm hoping to do so when I can find a suitable print drum. So far I do only 8x10 and I'm giddy with excitement.

    Slide films might also be extremely fine grained and sharp, but unless you plan on doing Ilfochromes, you're pretty much have to go digital.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  8. #18

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    A while back, it was Fuji Astia, which was a hair finer grained than the old Velvia. I'm not sure how the new Velvia 50 fits in. In general, reversal films have finer grain than negative films of the same speed. But people make too much of an issue of grain. The grain in many of the current films is too small to be insignificant for enlargements less than 14X17. Even when the grain becomes visible, it usually does not detract from the picture. The way the film renders the colorrs and the scenic values is far more important.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    Probably. K64 is a trad grain emulsion; E100 is T-grained.

    In projection, it's hard to see because both films are fine and sharp; in scans E100G is finer grained but it's also because it was optimized for better scanning.
    The latest-generation Fuji Astia, I believe, has the lowest published RMS Granularity number. E100G is pretty much even with Fuji Provia where grain is concerned and Fuji states that Astia is finer-grained than Provia.

    Astia does not quite have the edge sharpness of Provia, E100G, or Velvia, however. It's contrast, color saturation are also lower.
    Digital Photography is just "why-tech" not "high tech"..

  10. #20
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    Aside from slide film being finer grained then neg film, and neg film generally being sharper, I'd say Kodak 100UC and either Reala 100 or better yet Fuji 160S being the finest.

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