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  1. #11

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    I like the way it separates (manufactures?) green and blue-green tones in deep woods, while keeping clean greys. I remember my first roll of its predecessor, Fujichrome-50. I had some slides on Kodachrome, and being a cheap student, had bought the 50 at discount from a local store by taking 6 or so outdated rolls off their hands at once. I had thought that Kodachrome was kind of 'bright', but saw those first slides from the Fuji which made the Kodachrome look weak and undersaturated.

    I keep some around, but treat it with the same care I do a plugged-in coffee grinder or hot stove.

  2. #12

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    I guess a higher speed Velvia is OK. Personally I always thought the saturation and contrast was too much for everyday use. It's one of those films that are best when the day is overcast. I never liked it for "people shots". The skin always looked wrong. But if you shoot greenery or flowers in the shade, then it is good. Oh yeah, I pretty much had TMax figured out when they decided to change it. Now I am just collecting hearsay and data from other people before I buy it (and I still have a box of the "classic" TMax in the fridge).

  3. #13

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    The extra stop of Velvia is going to help. But what would REALLY help is better reciprocity. That way you could put that extra stop to better use in really overcast and lower light conditions.

    dgh
    David G Hall

  4. #14
    jd callow's Avatar
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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (David Hall @ Feb 22 2003, 05:48 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>The extra stop of Velvia is going to help.&nbsp; But what would REALLY help is better reciprocity.&nbsp; That way you could put that extra stop to better use in really overcast and lower light conditions.&nbsp;

    dgh</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    I agree. This film has always disapointed me due to the green shift when it starts to suffer reciprocity failure. For my tastes the palette is to &#39;candy coated.&#39; I like my films evil.

    *

  5. #15

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    My boss calls it "Disney colors", and I have to agree. For most things, it is usually just too garish and fake looking. I always liked more neutral films, even if they don&#39;t JUMP at you.

  6. #16

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    I like Velvia for shooting in the desert. Things tend to get a bit brown/dull green here. The Velvia can give it some extra pop.

    That said, Velvia in a portrait session is a sin.
    Official Photo.net Villain
    ----------------------
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  7. #17

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