Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,950   Posts: 1,585,963   Online: 954
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,075
    I've been using 400VC and, before that, 400UC. I noticed that the skies came out in all sorts of blue hues, from intense dark blue to washed out cyan. I was a little distressed, and I started looking for some answers. The most important one was that the sky color really does vary a lot, depending on such things as time of year, direction, time of day, altitude, wind conditions, level of smog and dust, moisture, and who knows what. It varies from dark blue to bluish-cyan - really. The high saturation color films, and probably the newer NC types as well, tend to exaggerate these differences.

  2. #12
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,561
    Images
    65
    I've had another thought on this. It could be due to the amount of UV in the light. I always use a UV filter to minimize any alteration of colors by variations in the UV content of daylight.

    Even though the film has a UV filter, and lenses filter out some UV, there is always a small but variable amount that strikes the film.

    PE

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Central NC
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    444
    Just got the optical print back from the lab. They had to fight with it as it's not at all an easy negative to print.

    The color balance on their final print is fairly close to neutral, that is, without much of a cast. And the sky in the print is a nice natural blue. So the problem is clearly the scan and not the film.

    I still don't know what I did wrong, but this is the wrong forum to discuss that. I just wanted to post a vindication for the film.

  4. #14
    Marco B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,983
    Images
    169
    Sounds to me like a scanner color profile problem. Any new film actually needs it own profile. If the drum scanner was not calibrated for this film, and you just used a generic color negative profile, it's bound to be off.

    I had severe problems scanning Fuji RVP100 dia positives on a Flextight scanner at a professional lab using a generic dia positive profile. All colors were way off... The same profile was giving good result with Fuji Provia100F...

    Probably a stupid question, but you don't mention it, so I'll ask anyway: Your own screen is properly hardware calibrated I assume??? If not, you can never judge the result of the scan.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin