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  1. #1
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    Naniwa Color Kit - ever heard of/used it?

    Along with the person in this thread: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum40/4...cess-home.html I too, have a hankering to do my own C-41 at home.

    A Japanese company makes something called the "Naniwa Color Kit" which includes all the chemicals and instructions to do C-41.

    Has anyone heard of it? Used it? Got any advice?

  2. #2
    nicolai's Avatar
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    I haven't, but there are a number of people on Flickr using it you could talk to. There's also a Naniwa group, but it's Japanese language-only.

  3. #3
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    I saw those, thanks. It seems to work okay I guess.

    I bought the kit the other day but haven't gotten around to making it yet. There are instructions in English & Japanese inside. The working temperatures and 10 day keep period are starting to scare me off a bit ...

  4. #4

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    I'm not familiar with the Naniwa kit specifically, but C-41 is normally a 100F (note F, not C) process. This isn't hard to achieve or maintain; just use a plastic tub filled with water at slightly above 100F as a water bath to raise the temperature of your working solutions, and put your developing tank in the water bath between agitations. You do have to be fairly precise with the temperatures, but not insanely so. IRC, Kodak recommends a deviation of no more than 1/2 a degree (or maybe it's 1/4 degree), but that's a conservative recommendation. If the temperature is a degree or two off, get it to 100F before developing the film.

    As to keeping life, color developer doesn't have a long shelf life once mixed to working strength. If the Naniwa kit ships as concentrated liquids, though, it should keep longer in concentrate form, so long as you store it properly, so you can dilute as much as you need for one session and keep the rest in concentrated form. If the Naniwa kit ships as powders, the powdered form should keep for a long time, but mixing part of a powdered developer is inadvisable, so you might want to save up your film until you've got enough to use the whole kit.

  5. #5
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    One of the big problems with C41 is that the film is so thick that it is dependant on the proper diffusion of chemistry.

    I have said it before, that if you try to do this at other than 100F, you will overdevelop the yellow (top) layer and underdevelop the cyan (bottom) layer. This is assuming that the magenta is properly developed.

    Just dip a piece of C41 film leader into developer at room temp and watch how slowly the bottom layer viewed through the base appears to develop compared to the top layer. At room temp, it takes over 20 minutes to develop the bottom layer properly. By then, the top layer is virtually fogged.

    PE



 

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