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  1. #1
    roteague's Avatar
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    Calypso - Changes to E6 Processing (not good news)

    From Calypso:

    Calypso Imaging, Inc. continues to be one of the best sources of professional E6 transparency processing in the United States. We use the tightest densitometric control parameters to maintain consistency and spot on color in our Olympic Refrema dip and dunk processor. Never- the- less the reality is that film usage is declining in all areas and Calypso needs to make appropriate adjustments. Starting immediately:

    1. We will run E6 on Mondays and Thursdays and ship film on Tuesdays and Fridays.
    2. Pricing will increase as follows:

    E6 Sleeved Plastic Mounts

    135-24 6.67/roll 7.86/roll
    135-36 6.67/roll 8.96/roll
    120 5.10/roll n/a
    220 10.00/roll n/a
    4x5 1.75/sheet n/a
    8x10 6.00/sheet n/a
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  2. #2
    Sanjay Sen's Avatar
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    Thankfully, my local pro lab (a Kodak Q-lab facility) still has a turnaround of four hours for E6, and the charges are only slightly higher (e.g., 4x5 is 2.15/sheet).

    I'm keeping my fingers crossed.



    Best wishes,
    Sanjay

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanjay Sen View Post
    Thankfully, my local pro lab ... still has a turnaround of four hours for E6...
    Same for me at one of my local labs... but I worry it will change any day now. Just a couple of months ago one of our local E-6 processors was shut down for good; they didn't have enough volume to make it worthwhile.

  4. #4
    eddym's Avatar
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    I can't get E6 processed anywhere on the island of Puerto Rico anymore.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  5. #5
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
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    im based in australia and my E-6 process or runs 12 hours a day 7 days a week with a volume high enough to warrant such a schedule, I have always been led to believe that the E-6 process is one that requires a constant high volume of material to be processed through it or otherwise the stagnation will lead to a higher chance of the chemistry drifting. My machine has never been idle to see this effect. If a machine is only processing 2 days a week does this open the doorway for a whole heap of control issues?

    I would love to hear form fellow pro lab owners on this as I have no experience with giving tanked machines down time.

    ~Steve Frizza
    The Lighthouse Lab

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Frizza View Post
    im based in australia and my E-6 process or runs 12 hours a day 7 days a week with a volume high enough to warrant such a schedule, I have always been led to believe that the E-6 process is one that requires a constant high volume of material to be processed through it or otherwise the stagnation will lead to a higher chance of the chemistry drifting. My machine has never been idle to see this effect. If a machine is only processing 2 days a week does this open the doorway for a whole heap of control issues?

    I would love to hear form fellow pro lab owners on this as I have no experience with giving tanked machines down time.

    ~Steve Frizza
    The Lighthouse Lab
    The bottom line is using control strips and the proper evaluation of them before running any customer film. If your process is "in control" then there are no worries. If it is "out of control" then there are measures you can take to bring it back into "control". I wouldn't worry about a top quality "pro" lab with a skilled darkroom technician running and evaluating the process, rather it is the cheap, mini-lab type of operations that do not have the skill to know what to do when the process is out-of-whack.

  7. #7
    BradS's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing this news Robert...it's not that bad all things considered. Seems that they are trying to keep prices reasonable.

    I have met a few of the folks at calypso...including a couple of "the film guys"....for the most part, a great bunch of folks. One of them even has a license plate..."4 by 5" or something like that....

  8. #8
    Lopaka's Avatar
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    At least they are still running it and keeping the prices reasonable. AFAIK, there is only one left in the Detroit area that still runs E-6 (last price quote was $2/4x5 sheet). I still run my own, and at least one local shop stocks the E6 5L kits at a lower price than Calumet.

    Bob
    "I always take a camera, That way I never have to say 'Gee, look at that - I wish I had a camera'" -Joe Clark, H.B.S.S.

  9. #9
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Hi Stephen

    I am with you on this one, You are very lucky and probably very talented to be running your machine at such volumes, I managed an E6 lab in my past life , where we ran the volumes that you speak, no problem on control as the process loves the volume.
    Unfortunately when volume drops , your anxiety levels will increase to a point where you will have to make tough decisions.
    The advant of inkjet in Toronto pretty well killed my Ciba process volume to a point where I only develop Cibas 3-4 times a year. Complete dump, complete process control and then run as much paper as clients can feed me. Once I have finished the last order dump and wait till volumne increases.
    This is also happening with the E6 lines in Toronto, one of the best just said f.... it and retired rather than battle keeping the machine in proper control.
    Toronto has one of the largest concentration of Digital Capture Professional Photographers than any other city that I am aware of in % of shooters.
    This decline started in the late 90' with the advent of phase and inkjet. I was lucky enough to not have a dip and dunk refrema line going but rather I delibertly set up Jobos and one shot chem for B&W and Colour neg.
    I decided against E6 as I reliezed there were two kick ass labs in town specializing in E6 and I did not see my involvement. I am now very glad of this decision.
    All I can say Stephan is try to gather as much business as you can and keep it , because once the volume lowers , life gets very painful. I would look into mail order to you as a niche player so that you can feed your machine.Anything to feed the machine would be my course of action,
    Running 2 days a week will be an absolute f.... nightmare so do not go down that road if you can avoid it.
    Bob


    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Frizza View Post
    im based in australia and my E-6 process or runs 12 hours a day 7 days a week with a volume high enough to warrant such a schedule, I have always been led to believe that the E-6 process is one that requires a constant high volume of material to be processed through it or otherwise the stagnation will lead to a higher chance of the chemistry drifting. My machine has never been idle to see this effect. If a machine is only processing 2 days a week does this open the doorway for a whole heap of control issues?

    I would love to hear form fellow pro lab owners on this as I have no experience with giving tanked machines down time.

    ~Steve Frizza
    The Lighthouse Lab

  10. #10
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
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    Thanks Bob

    Hi Bob

    Thanks so much for the feed back, I agree with your post entirely!
    I also agree with the earlier post about checking processes with control
    strips and enforce that any good lab should run at least 2 controls a day to see how there process is running.

    However on the subject of control strips and monitoring the process it is my guess that a constantly active processor would be a lot more stable than one with down time. And this would be preferable compared to having to check a control strip and spiking the system back to where it needs to be before any clients film is run.

    sorry if I seem pedantic I have had it drilled into me that the optimum way of running E-6 is to not keep it idol and with E-6 processing theres no forgiving. Many thanks for the replies.

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