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  1. #1
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    Ektachrome E200 in 120 size

    I am thinking of using Ektachrome E200 film in 120 size for a landscape project using extreme telephoto lenses - I have the general aim of achieving pronounced grain and slightly unreal color. Kodak claims that this film pushes well by up to 3 stops and I may well do this (2 stops at least) - does anyone have experience of this film in 120, particularly when pushed?

    Regards,

    David

  2. #2

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    I have pushed it up to 4 2/3 stops, though it does not push in a linear manner. Exposure compensation is needed for successive pushes. If you take a look at some of the night shots on BigTimeOperator.com website, you can get a little idea of how it responds.

    Usually I just use it at ISO 800 (push 3). The grain and contrast really undergo almost no change at that level. Beyond that there is a tendency towards a blue shift, and slightly more contrast. Grain does not become more noticeable unless you underexpose.

    Hope that helps a bit. If you have any other questions, or want to know some suggested settings, I can post another reply. I think it is a situation that you have to work with your lab a bit first, to determine what settings and compensation work best.

    An alternative is Fuji Provia 400X, though I think on comparison it is a more greenish toned film under push conditions. This can be good for builidings and automotive, though not quite as nice on skin tones.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio

  3. #3
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I have used a few rolls of this back when I shot chromes. I too found that a two stop under-exposure worked well, but that it needed a three stop push in the developer to get to what resembles a normal EI200 exposure/developing.
    I like the color balance a lot. A fine film.
    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #4

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    Funny thing when I saw this thread, I recently received a large order to E200 in roll film, in anticipation of an upcoming project. Unfortunately the recent fires have postponed many things in the San Diego area. Anyway, this is probably still my favorite film, even after using many other emulsions. Shame it is not made in 4x5.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio

  5. #5
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    Thanks for both these responses. It sounds as if E200 could be what I am looking for. Just to be clear - you both seem to be saying that if film is exposed at EI 800 (two stops under), you need to tell the lab to push-process as for 3 stops under. Is that correct?

    Regards,

    David

    P.S.: "When all else fails, read the instructions." I see that the Kodak data sheet says use EI 320 for 1 stop push, 640 for 2 stops and 800 for 3 stops. I think this chimes with Gordon's and Thomas's experience?
    Last edited by David H. Bebbington; 10-27-2007 at 10:21 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added PS

  6. #6

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    Hello David,

    Absolutely you can follow the Kodak recommendations on their data sheet. However, you need to be sure your lab is also following that. One way to do that would be to bracket a few shots on your first roll. Then you will have a baseline, and your lab will get a better feel for accurate results.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio



 

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