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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt5791 View Post
    Richard - interesting. I dont use a colour analyser yet, but I do use a DeVere 507 enlarger complete with the trans-stab unit, which I guess is a stabiliser.

    After monochrome printing, what amazes me is the speed of the paper - I commonly have exposures of around 3 - 7 seconds with an aperture of f22.

    Matt
    Likewise Matt but not quite as short. Maybe 3-7 at f16 mostly. With my 50mm Nikon El Nikkor f16 was the min aperture. To build in a safety margin I used a 75W lamp instead of a 100W. The alternative was to switch to the 6x6box on the Durst 605 and used the MF 80mm lens which went to f22.

    Neutral density is another solution but yes colour paper is very fast. Any burning or dodging becomes "problematical" at these exposures. Fortunately very few of my colour prints seem to need either dodging or burning. It's a pain when they do.


    pentaxuser

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt5791 View Post
    After monochrome printing, what amazes me is the speed of the paper - I commonly have exposures of around 3 - 7 seconds with an aperture of f22.
    FWIW, I also often need ridiculously short exposures with modern color paper. I typically deal with it by dialing down the light output. My Philips PCS150 light source lets me do this pretty easily; it's got separate red, green, and blue lights, and "filtration" is really just adjusting the brightness of each light. I typically dial down the red about 100 (equivalent to 100cc cyan filtration) and adjust the others from there. This typically gives me ~10-second exposures at f/8 from 35mm negatives on 8x10-inch paper. When printing smaller than this I often have to cut the aperture to f/11 or f/16 to avoid bumping into the minimum brightness ("maximum filtration") end of the scale for the other colors. If color paper gets any faster I'll have to buy an ND filter to use in addition to these tricks!

  3. #13
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    I use just about the same exposure for an average negative in color as I do for B&W, therefore Ilford MGIV grade 2 (30M) is 12" for an 8x10 from 35mm with about an f16. Same thing with my color prints but the filter pack is about 50R.

    PE

  4. #14
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    I do not use an analyzer and don't recommend one. I also don't believe that the warm up time is significant with anything but a fluorescent bulb.

    PE

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I do not use an analyzer and don't recommend one. I also don't believe that the warm up time is significant with anything but a fluorescent bulb.

    PE
    Hi Ron,
    I have an analyzer (a Beseler PM2A) and have found that it is generally not very useful for color analysis - it's just too difficult to find a spot on 2 different negatives that has the same color. What I have found it to be quite useful for is as a simple exposure meter. Once I get a negative printed the way I like it, I null out the analyzer. Then as I go to other negatives, the white light reading works quite well for determining exposure.
    I have found that the warm up time is significant when you're determining exposure from test strips - for example, if my test strips are made at 3 second intervals, and you're exposure comes out as something like 24 seconds, then just setting your timer to 24 sec. won't give quite the same result as 8 3 sec exposures. This is what I have seen for B&W printing - not sure about color as I always use a metronome now.

    Dan

  6. #16
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    Dan;

    I use an Ilford B&W meter for color and B&W. I have 2 and have one set for color and one set for B&W. They work just fine.

    PE

  7. #17

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    I find my Colorline analyser great and I think it is very accurate. If I am printing different negatives of a similar scene or of somebody in the same outfit etc I can quickly set a channel to give me filtration for that colour eg a grey suit on a wedding guest. But I still have the problem of not being able to replicate the same picture (No change in filtration or process times or temperatures even within a few seconds) and that is why I suspect the enlarger and its power supply or bulb etc. Incidentally I try to print with 10 second exposures, this needs lots of neutral density which I dial in with cyan ie 30cc of cyan matched with 30 cc of magenta and yellow equals one stop of exposure. With the Colorline I don't need to worry I can dial in any filtration and neutralise the affect by zeroing the magenta and yellow. The Analyser also works fantastically for B & W It gives me the filtration for multi grade paper and tells me the relative contrast or delta for a given negative and sets the analyser to filter the light for the given grade. This improved my black and white immensely. I can usually get a great print first time now. I have found in the past without an analyser that colour was easier than black and white; strange that a colour analyser has improved my black and white, but still leaves me with a colour problem.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Likewise Matt but not quite as short. Maybe 3-7 at f16 mostly. With my 50mm Nikon El Nikkor f16 was the min aperture. To build in a safety margin I used a 75W lamp instead of a 100W. The alternative was to switch to the 6x6box on the Durst 605 and used the MF 80mm lens which went to f22.

    Neutral density is another solution but yes colour paper is very fast. Any burning or dodging becomes "problematical" at these exposures. Fortunately very few of my colour prints seem to need either dodging or burning. It's a pain when they do.


    pentaxuser
    I'm thinking - I could probably slow it down if I switched to the 5"X7" diffuser box (I guess that is what it is called).

    I do like short exposure times, but these are kind of just a bit too short.

  9. #19

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    DSLATER
    My analyser has a metronome feature too. I have never tried this but it sounds a good idea. Thanks, I'll keep you posted next time I do RA4.

  10. #20
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    Regarding my short exposure times - I wonder if this is anything to do with the amount of filtration I find I am commonly using in the DeVere colour head - I always seem to be hovering around 20M 20Y - or thereabouts.

    Don't know if this is significant.

    Matt

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