Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,008   Posts: 1,524,609   Online: 1053
      
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 47

Thread: Kodak Vision 3

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    OH
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,789
    Images
    2
    Wow, I had no idea Vision 3 was coming out. Are the Vision 2 stocks that old? I thought in the last 5 years or so... Exciting to see new films still being worked on.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Cleveland, OH
    Posts
    378
    To answer your question Tim, no Vision2 stocks aren't old, the first of which, Vision2 500T only being introduced in 2002. EXR 50D, which was introduced in the late 1980s, was only finally improved to a Vision2 version (there was no Vision 50D improvement) last year, so these sorts of improvements don't happen cross-line as they tend to with Portra films, but start with the fastest stocks and trickle down.

    It actually remains to be seen how much of an improvement this film is, as it appears to be heavily optimized for scanning, and does not claim to incorporate triple-electron sensitization (although that is not to say that it won't)

    It is being plugged by Kodak as a premium product, not a replacement to Vision2 500T, so Kodak is either keeping Vision2 films in production still or is trying to let their Vision2 stocks deplete before they will toute Vision3 as an actual replacement to Vision2. One thing that I remember being said was that it is difficult to see any improvements in Vision3 over Vision2 in traditional optical printing, but it makes for a more substantial improvements in digital intermediate films where the whole thing is scanned first and then lasered back onto print stock. So there may be a trend toward this as opposed to improvements in actual optical characteristics in still films in the future, in fact improvements that hurt optical characteristics somewhat. But any new film is a good film and I congratulate Kodak in keeping the ball rolling.

    ~KB

  3. #13
    kapro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Slovakia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    82
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by PHOTOTONE View Post
    Well, interesting to think about. Kodak has, what, about 50,000 employees? Ilford/Harman Technology has, I think less than 200. I would guess that Efke and Foma have less than 100 combined. Don't know what Fuji has, but they are also into manufacture of cameras, both digital and film. It takes higher volume production for Kodak to break even, but they have room to downsize more, if needed, I would think.
    Three weeks ago I was told by the person from Foma's marketing department that they have 400 employees...
    BTW, I recommended him to visit Apug site.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by PHOTOTONE View Post
    Ilford/Harman Technology has, I think less than 200. I would guess that Efke and Foma have less than 100 combined.
    Ilford: Simon Galley said that Ilford has about 400 employees. Fotokemika Nova (Efke) has about 30. They have a real small scale production. Their machines are the original german Adox machines from the fifties. They are using a unique process, called "Tauchbadverfahren". No other film/paper manufacturer uses this process.

    Best regards,
    Jana

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by PHOTOTONE View Post
    ...

    I don't know what it would take for small theatres in the small towns of the USA, and in the less developed countries of the world to switch to digital projection...the owners just don't have the money. Even if the equipment manufacturers provide special long-term financing, or lease options, it is hard to justify when you only make $1500 to $2000 a week in gross ticket sales, of which a high percentage of that goes to the film distributor. Traditional film projectors are (for all practical purposes) bullet proof, and last for generations of use, with only minor parts replacement.
    Yes, that is exactly the problem.
    Recently there was a very interesting report concerning this issue in a german film publication: To install digital projection costs more than 100.000 € per screen! So even in a small cinema center in a small town with few visitors a cinema owner has to invest over 500.000 €. Very high costs, but not more income. For most of the cinema owners it is impossible to make such high investments. Therefore they say the film release firms have to pay for this, but the release firms say no, the cinemas have to pay.
    Therefore at least in Germany only very few cinemas have installed digital projectors so far. And they have them installed parallel to the 35mm film projectors, not as a replacement!

    So even for an industrial country digital projection in cinemas is very or even too expensive. And now look at India ("Bollywood" is much more film consuming than Hollywood), China, Asia in general, Latin America, Africa. It is very likeliy that movie film with its low costs will be state of the art in these areas for many many years.

    Best regards,
    Jana

  6. #16
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sandy Hook, CT
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    973
    Wow, 100K Euros to install a digital projector system? That's astronomical ... And, for what? It's not like the quality is significantly higher (if at all), and maintenance on the projector is probably going to be a significant cost if something goes wrong.

    Good to see motion picture film still going strong. Let's hope it stays that way.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Van Buren, Arkansas
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,412
    Images
    101
    Quote Originally Posted by htmlguru4242 View Post
    Wow, 100K Euros to install a digital projector system? That's astronomical ... And, for what? It's not like the quality is significantly higher (if at all), and maintenance on the projector is probably going to be a significant cost if something goes wrong.

    Good to see motion picture film still going strong. Let's hope it stays that way.
    And..just to put that in perspective, you can equip a theater with used/rebuilt 35mm projectors, lamphouses, lenses, and mono sound for under $10,000..sometimes far under, depending on your bargaining.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    196
    the ending result for digital age is
    your are going to pay more, whether using digital or film.
    --Digital: keep upgrading the camera bodies, photoshop or other software and your computer system

    --Film: since supply is declining, the price on film and processing is increasing.

    bottom line --- users will always pay more.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    196
    Quote Originally Posted by PHOTOTONE View Post
    The film industry is still very strongly centered on FILM for initial photography, including higher-end dramatic TV production. This is a matter of taste for many many cinematographers and directors. They have enthusiastically embraced digital post-production though.
    That's what I always believe for color, initial FILM, post Digitally. Too bad, they never make decent film scanner for consumers. Instead, we are paying big bucks for scanning in the shops.

    B/W is another story..

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    115
    Quote Originally Posted by dxphoto View Post

    --Film: since supply is declining, the price on film and processing is increasing.
    I don't know how it is in other countries, but in Germany film and processing prices are decreasing. Ten years ago I had to pay more for my materials. Lower demand, lower prices. Not astonishing in a free market economy with strong competition.

    Best regards,
    Jana

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin