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  1. #1

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    Reciprocity failure

    Hey folks,

    I'll be going to Yosemite for 3 days this winter (right before Christmas, during the full moon) and would like to do some of my shooting by moonlight. I have recently made the transition from digital to film, so reciprocity failure in film is a new concept to me. From what I gathered over at Wikipedia...

    Basically, film becomes less sensitive over longer exposure times and each film emulsion will have varying reciprocity correction factors.

    To help prepare for this in advance, what are some films that are well suited for long exposure, night time photography? While it's not guaranteed that the moon will be showing (cloud cover), if the skies ARE clear, then I should get a decent amount of light.

    Thanks,

    Jason

    (Oh, and if you have any shooting tips for Yosemite during the winter, that would be most appreciated too! Thanks!)

  2. #2
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    When I don't need to take advantage of reciprocity I use Fuji Acros, since it is not subject to reciprocity failure. A year or so ago I was doing some full moon exposures, and was getting good results at f/11 for 8 minutes or so. If I would have had to account for reciprocity with that exposure time, it would have been hours.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  3. #3
    Lee L's Avatar
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    http://www.thenocturnes.com/ is a good place for info.

    There are lots of reciprocity failure threads on APUG that can be found with a search. The most extensive one is titled reciprocity misbehavior. http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/1...sbehavior.html
    over 11 pages long.

    Lee

  4. #4

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    Best advice, don't stand under potential snow or ice falls from above. They can kill you.

    Drink plenty of liquids in the cold environment. Keep exposure to the cold to a minimum so you don't damage toes and fingers.

    Are you shooting color or B&W?
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  5. #5

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    Thanks Firephoto! Minutes to hours, that is a big difference indeed. I will get a roll or two, but are there similar films in color?

    Thanks for those links Lee. I should have done a search first and I apologize!

    And I appreciate your concern for safety Pinholemaster! I've never been exposed to the snow before (well, except for a ski trip once, but there was no real snow fall) so those are helpful tips. I'll try to bundle up as much as possible, but I do plan on walking around the valley for at least a couple of hours.

  6. #6
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    just watch what's underfoot when you're moving, and overhead when you're not, and you'll be fine.

  7. #7
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasonjoo View Post
    Thanks for those links Lee. I should have done a search first and I apologize!
    No big problem. It's hard to grasp the number of posts on APUG. It's nearing half a million posts (many on photography ) so a search is often rewarding and you may even get your answers more quickly.

    Lee

  8. #8

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    If you're shooting b&w you'll have more latitude. If you're shooting colour slide, you'll pull your hair out for a couple of years. Then it gets relatively predictable. Getting to know your materials without the review screen is the main part.

    btw, thanks for the link Lee.

  9. #9
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    For color slide, the Fuji slide films have good reciprocity characteristics (Velvia, Provia 100F and 400F, Astia, and probably the others as well).

    For B&W, T-Max 100 has excellent reciprocity. For long exposures, it's actually faster than Tri-X.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #10
    Nigel's Avatar
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    I'll throw in my $0.02 (US or CDN, since they are trading just around par).

    You don't mention color or B&W, but I will assume color. I have been doing night photography for a few years now. The best film I have found is Provia 100F. It has excellent reciprocity characterisitics; I have never found a need to apply corrections. It is also relatively free of color shifts; all the other e-6 films I have tried have had color shifts. The shifts are predictable, and so can be corrected, but why bother if there is an alternative.

    Use a spot meter. Any ambient light readings, unless you are using a very sensitive meter, are going to tell you that you are in complete darkness. Meter for bright spots then then adjust your exposure to be several stops longer. Bracket your exposures; several will be useable, but you will find one you prefer. Typically for any scene I take at least three photos holding aperture constant in incresing exposure time.

    Take a flashlight. Being dark, it can be difficult to see things like aperture markings. Take a cell phone and let people know where you are going and when they should expect you back.

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