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  1. #11

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    E-6 is fun...right when you're done you see your images -- no need to print or scan

  2. #12
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    E6 is fun, but hand mixing from scratch in the lab is quite tedious.

    PE

  3. #13
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    Thanks for the repsonses! I'm looking to purchase the Kodak kit and try it myself and see if I like it. I'm trying to get away from all dependence on outside sources for any of my photographic needs. I develop and print my own B&W and I'm trying to take away a step for my color work.

    As far as the water bath idea, which I would use, does the water in the bath need to be the same as the developer or warmer? What about agitation.. same as B&W?

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    Thanks for the repsonses! I'm looking to purchase the Kodak kit and try it myself and see if I like it. I'm trying to get away from all dependence on outside sources for any of my photographic needs. I develop and print my own B&W and I'm trying to take away a step for my color work.

    As far as the water bath idea, which I would use, does the water in the bath need to be the same as the developer or warmer? What about agitation.. same as B&W?
    I like the independence of being able to develop my own E-6 too. It's great, and sure beats waiting for your film to come back in the mail. If your water bath is regulated well, with a phototherm or good aquarium heater you could just set it to 100 degrees (processing temperature for all solutions) put all your solutions in and come back later after everything is preheated.

    The one thing to be careful of is that your tank needs to be pre-heated as well. If it's not it will cool down the first developer, especially if you are agitating your tank outside the water bath. Agitation is generally the same as B&W, the kit you buy usually has instructions.

    That being said I recommend some form of automatic agitation to take out the drudgery of agitating for 30 minutes straight. I use a Jobo 1540 and a Uniroller (cheap on Ebay) and it works pretty well, but it can't be used in water bath which isn't good for temperature control. My next project is setting up a electric motor that will sit above the Jobo while it's in the water bath and rotate it bidirectionally. Inspired by this homemade E-6 processor.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    I'm trying to get away from all dependence on outside sources for any of my photographic needs. I develop and print my own B&W and I'm trying to take away a step for my color work.
    Keep in mind that printing E-6 in a traditional way now requires Ilfochrome paper and chemicals, both of which are ridiculously expensive. (There used to be other options, but they've vanished.) Of course, if you want to view slides using a slide projector or scan then, E-6 is perfectly good, but for prints, C-41 is better. There are also Ilfochrome fans who are willing to pay the price, of course.

    As far as the water bath idea, which I would use, does the water in the bath need to be the same as the developer or warmer? What about agitation.. same as B&W?
    I generally start out with a water bath that's slightly warmer than what the process calls for; however, I don't use a water heater in my bath, so it tends to cool over time. I find that when the water in the bath is a bit warmer than 100F (I use 40C, since it's clearly marked on the thermometer I use for the bath), the developer comes up to 100F, I begin processing, and the temperature in the next couple of steps stays fairly constant for a few minutes -- long enough to get through the really temperature-sensitive parts of the process. If it looks like the temperature of the color developer is too high, I remove it from the water bath a couple of minutes before I need it. If it's too low, I put the bottle under hot running water for a few seconds. After the color developer step the temperature can drop a bit. I can compensate by adding more hot water, but as temperature control isn't as critical after the color developer, if it goes up or down by a degree or two I don't sweat it.

    IIRC, recommended agitation for E-6 is slightly different than for B&W; however, to simplify matters for my brain, I use the same agitation for all processes (first 30 seconds and 5s every 30s thereafter). This seems to work fine for me -- or at least, I get results I find acceptable most of the time, and on those occasions when I haven't another explanation has seemed more likely than agitation issues (old developer, for instance).

  6. #16

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    One piece of advice...do NOT use a glass-bottom aquarium for yor water bath

    I had a 20 gallon aquarium full of hot water & I used 1 pound spools of lead-free solder to weigh down the bottles so they wouldn't float around too much

    well, halfway through the process one of the spools of solder fell to the bottom & broke the glass....so 20 gallons of 100F water splashed all over the floor

    the film still came out fine, but the rug was a mess

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    Keep in mind that printing E-6 in a traditional way now requires Ilfochrome paper and chemicals, both of which are ridiculously expensive.
    Tragically, that is true...
    Of course, if you want to view slides using a slide projector
    ...but on the other hand, I can't think of that as just an aside; viewing your slides on a projector is wonderful - it beats a piddly print any day of the week. I get more joy from a vibrant wonderful image projected on the wall by my trusty Reflecta than I ever will a print. That's the whole reason I shoot E6.
    There are also Ilfochrome fans who are willing to pay the price, of course.
    Ilfochrome is indeed beautiful from my currently limited experience (I've only produced half a dozen.) You're right, if your desired end result is a traditional print, E6 is nuts; but Ilfochrome prints are gorgeous and you get to keep the joy of the projector.

    And I think, above all, nothing makes you realise you're a photography bore more than sending an audience to sleep through a slideshow. If you only shoot C41, you're missing out on that
    Another day goes under; a little bourbon will take the strain...

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by tim_walls View Post
    And I think, above all, nothing makes you realise you're a photography bore more than sending an audience to sleep through a slideshow. If you only shoot C41, you're missing out on that
    You can make slides from negatives! ;-)

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    You can make slides from negatives! ;-)
    Both Kodak and Fuji have discontinued the print film AFAIK.

    PE

  10. #20

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    Sorry, the Tetenal 3-bath E6 hack is just that... A hack.

    Take your time and perform the seven steps needed for E6, and you'll be as happy as a clam at high tide.

    Besides, it's relaxing and fun knowing you're developing your E-6 film dead-to-nuts...

    Quote Originally Posted by argus View Post
    I also use the Tetenal 3-bath kit.
    You don't really need a JOBO to develop. A tempering bath will also do the job.

    G

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