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  1. #1
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    How easy is home brewed E-6?

    I would like to develop my own E-6. I already process my own black and white and print it. Is there a good Jobo system that can be purchased used? I'm lookin to develop 120 E-6. How are all you home E-6er's doing it?

  2. #2

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    with a kit of chemicals it was pretty easy...I just used regular developing tanks and kept the chemical bottles warm in large buckets of water...and had several gallon jugs of hot water for the wash steps

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Making up your own E6 chemistry from raw chemicals is not difficult, but more prone to problems and it's probably better to use a commercially available kit.

    An ordinary tank is fine, only the first developer time.temperature is critical.

    Ian

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    It's dead easy with the chemical kits; I started with the Tetenal kits, but use Kodak's now as although there are more steps there is less washing.
    I wrote a short guide when I started - http://www.yarki.net/E6/ I think (posting from phone so tricky to check right now!)

  5. #5

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    I also use the Tetenal 3-bath kit.
    You don't really need a JOBO to develop. A tempering bath will also do the job.

    G

  6. #6
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    If you can develop B&W, you can do color; you just have to be very picky about temperature.

    To maintain temperature, I have heard about people using tempering boxes. The lower tech solution is an insulated box. I don't even go that far. I have a Rubbermaid tub in which I keep my developing gear. I put in water at the appropriate temperature in that and top it up with hot water to maintain temperature during the process. Once you are past the color developer, temperature is less important, so it is only the first 15 minutes or so that is really critical.

    I use the Kodak kit. It can be mixed in small quantities and I find the keeping properties of the concentrates to be excellent. I have used first developer concentrate that has been open for several months with no visible deterioration in results.

  7. #7

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    I did it for years, and finally decided that it was less expensive in the long run to have it done commercially (unless you always get every possible roll out of the kit). And somehow there's not the satisfaction I get from developing B&W.

  8. #8

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    As others have said, if you can do B&W, you can also do E-6; the main (only, really) extra trick is temperature control, which can be managed with a water bath.

    The biggest real problem (as opposed to tricky part) is this: Kodak's "official" E-6 process is a 6-bath process (more, really, if you count the final rinse and a couple of intervening water rinses). Thus, it takes much longer to do than a typical B&W process. Even more than the actual process time increase, there's extra time spent mixing up the seven different chemical baths for the process. I personally find this tedious; it takes me 30-45 minutes just to get ready! That said, there are "3-bath" E-6 kits that are much quicker to set up and use; however, they use chemical "shortcuts" to get it down to "three" baths (again, it's really more when you add in the final rinse and intervening rinses). You might or might not be satisfied with the results of a 3-bath kit. Price-wise, they're more expensive than Kodak's kit, too. IIRC, Kodak's 6-bath kit is $50 for a 5-liter kit, whereas third-party 3-bath kits are about $35-$40 for 1-liter kits.

  9. #9

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    Im with Bill (see above). I have processed E6 in both 3 and 6 bath kits and before that E2/3 and Ferraniacolor. I See no point in spending time doing it when a good commercial lab can do it fot a similar cost! I will maybe change this view once all the labs cease trading .
    I would not advocate mixing your own brews from individual chemicals unless you are some sort of analytical chemist used to precise working, have access to a good analytical balance and have the means to adjust the pH of the respective developers when they come out a bit out of the desired range as they will from time to time.
    If you insist on doing your own - then a standard tank is fine, take care with the temperatures which are pretty critical , and use a 6 bath kit rather than the 3 -bath. Good luck!

  10. #10
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tim_walls View Post
    ... I wrote a short guide when I started - http://www.yarki.net/E6/ I think (posting from phone so tricky to check right now!)
    Excellent! Your guide is giving me the itch to try E-6 myself ...
    Those who know, shoot film

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