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  1. #1

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    fuji pro 160 S and default setting.

    Received a nice gift from my local camera store yesterday when the manager gave me a dozen rolls of this film.I usually shoot color film in a Muji II or T-4.Will these cameras default the 160 iso to 100 or give me the full value of 160?

  2. #2

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    It will look better in my experience shot at 100 any way. I find Fuji 160 a bit dull and the extra exposure will saturate the colours a bit more.

  3. #3

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    I get fine results at 125 ISO, 1/3 stop open, but I'm sure it looks equally great at 2/3 stop open. All depends on your meter and shutter accuracy.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  4. #4
    Lee L's Avatar
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    The instructions for the T4 don't mention setting at full stop intervals only, so it should set to 160 from the DX code on the film cassette. You could fool the T4 into exposing Pro 160S at ISO 100 by taping over the DX code, in which case the camera defaults to ISO 100.

    The same trick with tape will set the Olympus Stylus 35 (US model of your camera) to ISO 100. I can't find my son's instructions, but I believe this line of Olympus cameras sets at ISO 50, 100, 200, 400, 800, etc, closest to the DX markings on the film cassette, so it would set ISO 160 to 200. I'd personally go with the tape and ISO 100.

    I normally shoot Pro 160S at ISO 125, and the extra third of a stop at ISO 100 wouldn't hurt.

    Lee

  5. #5
    Thanasis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L View Post

    I normally shoot Pro 160S at ISO 125, and the extra third of a stop at ISO 100 wouldn't hurt.

    Lee
    Do you take this into account when you develop the film or tell your lab to adjust the developing time to suit? Or do you have them develop it as normal?

    regards.
    Thanasis

  6. #6
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thanasis View Post
    Do you take this into account when you develop the film or tell your lab to adjust the developing time to suit? Or do you have them develop it as normal?

    regards.
    Thanasis
    As normal. It works well that way with all my meters in all modes: studio flash, ambient, TTL, contrasty, low contrast, incident, reflected, spot, averaging...

    I find that it gives me a bit fuller shadow detail with a less grainy look in the shadows. At 160 it's just a hair too thin in the shadows for my taste. It's only a third of a stop after all, but the 125 rating suits my usage.

    PE has posted on this method of giving a bit extra exposure with color negative film several times here on APUG, and it fits my personal observations over the years. I don't automatically downrate all color neg films, but I find I like some films better this way, and make the adjustment after considerable shooting under highly varied conditions. In part I think it's a tendency of manufacturers who want to advertizing a higher film speed to err on the side of being generous about film speeds.

    Lee

  7. #7
    Thanasis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L View Post
    As normal. It works well that way with all my meters in all modes: studio flash, ambient, TTL, contrasty, low contrast, incident, reflected, spot, averaging...

    I find that it gives me a bit fuller shadow detail with a less grainy look in the shadows. At 160 it's just a hair too thin in the shadows for my taste. It's only a third of a stop after all, but the 125 rating suits my usage.

    PE has posted on this method of giving a bit extra exposure with color negative film several times here on APUG, and it fits my personal observations over the years. I don't automatically downrate all color neg films, but I find I like some films better this way, and make the adjustment after considerable shooting under highly varied conditions. In part I think it's a tendency of manufacturers who want to advertizing a higher film speed to err on the side of being generous about film speeds.

    Lee
    Thanks for the reply. I've got about five rolls in the fridge that I didn't really know what to do with or how to shoot until now. I'll try a few experiments.

  8. #8
    jd callow's Avatar
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    I had an instructor tell me to assume that all colour neg film to be exposed at half the box speed if you haven't used it before. I have found this to be excellent advice and have only run into a hand full of neg films that preformed better at less than half the box speed, one that worked well at the box speed and a couple that worked better at over half (1 1/3 stops over). A lot depends upon the accuracy of your equipment and the style in which you meter. The cool thing about colour neg film is that with all those dye layers the more exposure the sharper and more saturated the image. With kodak and to a lesser degree Fuji it is very hard to over expose the film.

    *



 

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