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Thread: Motion film

  1. #21
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbelyaev View Post
    It would be interesting to know opinions of those who used to use vision or eterna films in still cameras. Kodak has very nice images on its website. I'm just not sure whether the results worth the troubles of finding and developing motion picture films.

    I'll repeat again that it also takes a place willing to print the film onto the proper print material. Endura type color paper will not work!

    PE

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    I'll repeat again that it also takes a place willing to print the film onto the proper print material. Endura type color paper will not work!

    PE
    A&I will print these films on photo paper. (according to A&I website)

  3. #23
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    They will most likely be low in contrast. I know of no easy way to increase the contrast. The values would be as follows: Normal film print = 0.6 film x 2.5 paper, Vision print = 0.5 film x 2.5 paper. (Color print film is over 3.0 in contrast for reference)

    PE

  4. #24

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    I bought some motion picture films from A&I in Hollywood when I was there in December. They had a good range of Fuji & Kodak neg & reversal. Itīs all bulk loaded, no DX code & $5 a roll from memory. I want to try it just for the hell of it. With the choices of film narrowing in recent years I want to take advantage of any opportunity to try some film that I havenīt used before.

    Processing is $15 a roll ECN2 plus for extra they can scan to a CD or do prints. Processing takes a couple of weeks or longer I believe. Their website says 1 week but the woman I spoke to at their Santa Monica facility thought it would take a few weeks. Iīve only shot a couple of rolls & havenīt had any results back yet so canīt comment further. Probably most of the film I bought will end up being exposed back in Sydney & then be posted to A&I and back so itīll be awhile before I know whether it will be worth taking any further, ie if i really like the look of one of the stocks.

  5. #25
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    Scanning and correcting digitally is one method to fix up Vision contrast and make prints either on Endura or on a fully digital printer. I don't want to go there though!

    PE

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by ricksplace View Post
    I managed to win two 400' rolls of Ilford FP4+ movie film a few years ago. About the only difference I can notice is the sprocket holes are slightly rounded. What would b&w negative film be used for in 35mm movie cameras?

    wtf is remjet?
    Remjet is a backing that's placed on color motion picture films. IIRC, it's used for anti-halation properties, but my memory is foggy on that, so I could well be wrong. The bottom line for do-it-yourselfers is that it must be removed during processing, and this is a bit of a pain if you do your own processing. It's also claimed to gunk up commercial C-41 photofinishing lines, so giving a roll of ECN-2 film to a C-41 lab will get the film returned unprocessed (or their ire, if they actually process it).

    AFAIK, B&W motion picture films don't have a remjet coating, so this isn't an issue when using B&W motion picture films in a still camera. I don't know offhand what differences do exist between B&W motion picture and similar still films.

    More generally speaking, although I've never processed ECN-2 films myself, I do have some ~20-year-old ECN-2 negatives that I've printed on modern papers. I've only done this with a few snapshots, though, to give copies to my sister. The results seemed OK; certainly not as bad as I'd expect based on PE's comments. The results were not great, though; I get more vibrant colors from older C-41 and C-22 negatives that I've printed myself. Based on my limited experience (just a few prints), my guess is that people who prefer a somewhat low-contrast and low-saturation look, or who want such a look for specific photos, might be interested in using an ECN-2 film for still photography. Personally, though, and for most scenes, I plan to stick to C-41 films, although if I acquired some ECN-2 film I might shoot it just out of curiosity and keep some in the freezer in case I'd find a use for it in the future.

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    One of the website have short ends (200feet) of vision 2 250d. It is a lot of film. Don't want to waste it if there is no significant difference.

  8. #28
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    Remjet is carbon black in a water soluable polymer base which washes off in mild alkali or developer (bad). It is used as an AH layer and also an antistatic backing for high speed transport of the film during coating and exposure.

    If you do a poor job of removing it, it gets into the emulsion and leaves black dots there. It is similar to a post in another thread where I said that any insoluable suspended matter in processing solutions can do this. Some disagreed wtih me, but this is indeed true and you can ruin a developer if you get remjet into it. Remjet must be removed before processing, by wetting and scrubbing only the back side of the film. No remjet should carry over and none should get onto the emulsion side. Scrubbing around the perfs is particularly necessary.

    PE

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricksplace View Post
    What would b&w negative film be used for in 35mm movie cameras?


    Rick.
    ......opening sequence to Kill Bill Volume 2, as one example (Kodak Double X was used)

    http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/pr...4.6.24.4&lc=en

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbelyaev View Post
    It would be interesting to know opinions of those who used to use vision or eterna films in still cameras. Kodak has very nice images on its website. I'm just not sure whether the results worth the troubles of finding and developing motion picture films.
    It is very expensive to shoot motion picture film - but I would rather have 15 minutes of well exposed, well composed 16mm then 10 hours of video.

    It just looks awesome. I shot a number of ski holidays on super8 and, recently for the first time, 16mm (previously ruled our for weight reasons).

    Yes - probably the most expensive home movie ever, but when edited properly everyone could hardly believe it was a home movie.

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