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  1. #11
    erikg's Avatar
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    No, 126 is instamatic and 127 is the large roll film. Maybe you could do a snip test? Probably a lot of fog on the roll.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by msage View Post
    Sorry you have that backwards. 126 is Instamatic and 127 is roll. As I post this I am looking at both.
    Michael
    126 has a paper backing, so it is a roll film in a plastic cassette. 127 E 4, I am not sure about E 6 were called super slides. I vaguely recall that 127 super slides fit in a standard projector, or is my memory fading.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobbyR View Post
    126 was roll film; 127 was instamatic.

    The only 127 did was E4 but it may have changed to later formats.


    Quote Originally Posted by msage View Post
    Sorry you have that backwards. 126 is Instamatic and 127 is roll. As I post this I am looking at both.
    Michael
    As per Wiki:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Film_format

  4. #14

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    Check: http://www.nwmangum.com/Kodak/FilmHist.html

    The original 126 film was introduced in 1900 and discontinued by Kodak in 1949, It produced 4-1/4 by 6-1/2 negatives. I'm not sure if Kodacolor was ever made in that size, but if it was it would use the very oldest Kodacolor process (pre-C22). The other 126 film was for the original Instamatic. This was 35mm film with a paper backing and special perforation housed in a plastic cassette. Both C22 and C41 Kodacolor were made in that size. If you have Kodacolor-X, it's C22; otherwise, it is most likely C41. 127 film was 46 mm wide roll film made for a variety of cameras over a very long time. I think Kodak discontinued it in the 1980s, but some European suppliers still make it.

  5. #15

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    126 Instamatic size film can be processed on standard 35mm reels, as the film is the same width as 35mm, but only has one single perforation per square frame. When one would shoot slides on 126 Instamatic, they would be returned in mounts to fit 35mm slide projectors. The image, of course would be square.

    127 roll film, did indeed yield slides known as "Super Slides" and they too would be returned in mounts to fit 35mm slide projectors, but with a much larger square image area.

    110 size "pocket instamatic" film when shot as slides would be returned mounted in small mounts designed to fit a "Pocket" Carousel projector. A much smaller minature projector. I don't think this was ever very popular.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by PHOTOTONE View Post
    126 Instamatic size film can be processed on standard 35mm reels, as the film is the same width as 35mm, but only has one single perforation per square frame. When one would shoot slides on 126 Instamatic, they would be returned in mounts to fit 35mm slide projectors. The image, of course would be square.

    127 roll film, did indeed yield slides known as "Super Slides" and they too would be returned in mounts to fit 35mm slide projectors, but with a much larger square image area.

    110 size "pocket instamatic" film when shot as slides would be returned mounted in small mounts designed to fit a "Pocket" Carousel projector. A much smaller minature projector. I don't think this was ever very popular.
    The 110 slides could be ordered in standard size mounts to run through a standard slide projector. The image, of course, was smaller.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post
    My screw-up as there were several cameras with the name 126 that I know did not use roll film.
    Been too long.
    Bobby

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    If you have Kodacolor-X, it's C22; otherwise, it is most likely C41. 127 film was 46 mm wide roll film made for a variety of cameras over a very long time. I think Kodak discontinued it in the 1980s, but some European suppliers still make it.
    My impression is that this is a store-brand film with the store-brand name being "King Size." I don't know who made store-brand films in the pre-C41 era, so if it's from that time I don't know what the candidate processes might be. If it's of more recent vintage it's almost certainly C-41.

    I vaguely recall hearing that it's possible to process C41 film in a B&W developer and then redevelop it in C41 or a modified C41 process to get a color image. If this is true, that might be a good way to go -- develop the film as B&W, print and/or scan the resulting negatives for safety, and then redevelop as C41 if the edge markings give any hope that it's a C41 film.

  9. #19

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    Rocky Mountain Film lists these brands of c-22:

    Additional types of C-22 films we can process: Ansco Color, Brilliant film, FK Color, Furicolor, Inter Color, Karanzcolor N21 or N19, 3M Color Print, Negra Color, Oga Color, Prinz Color, Revue, Sakuara, Sears Color, Tura Color, Cornet, Valcolor, Twin Pix, Global CN100, Shell, Ferrania Color Film, @M NM64, Titan, Pal-color, Extra Spool, Milyerson, Nat'l. Hdqrs. Box 7529 Phil.,Pa., Process 22, Paragon, Thrifty Color Neg, Porst Color, Teta Color, Ring Foto, Citcolor, Revue Colour 2000, Trifca MK VI, FCA, Fotop Colour, Color MN19, Directacolor, Picture Pac Color Picture, Montgomery Ward Color Print ASA80, Hanimex Vistacolor ASA100, 22, Ektacolor Type S, Boots Color Print.

    Perhaps they can help you.
    Bobby

  10. #20

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    The largest roll film size the original Kodacolor came in was 122 (3A size, 3-1/4" by 5-1/2" exposures). It didn't stay available for long, and was gone long before the anti-trust settlement and the C-22 process. The other common roll sizes made it at least to Kodacolor-II (120, 620, 126 Instamatic, 127, 116, 616, and 828), the first C-41 film. The 110 Pocket Instamatic format started the C-41 process in 1972, the other sizes came out in 1973.

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