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Thread: velvia 100f

  1. #1

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    velvia 100f

    I HAVE HEARD THAT VELVIA 100F IS LESS SATURATED THAN VELVIA 50. MOST REVIEWS TELL ME TO STAY AWAY FROM 100F. ONE REVIEW SAID NEVER TO SHOOT "RED ROCK" WITH VELVIA 50. I AM GOING TO THE GRAND CANYON IN MARCH. DOES ANYONE HAVE ANY EXPERIENCE WITH VELVIA 100F THAT COULD ENLIGHTEN ME A LITTLE?

  2. #2

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    I truly have to laugh that some people are so opinionated that they will not use perfectly good products. Both Velvias produce exaggerated color saturation. The 50 a bit moreso than the 100f. If extremely color saturated color is what you want then use either.

  3. #3

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    People wright a lot of nonsense. Don't listen to anyone. Use 100f. The film is very nice. It will produce beautiful slides as long as it is developed properly.
    I used to use it a lot when I lived in New Mexico.

  4. #4

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    I've used Velvia 100F for various commercial assignments for years. Beautiful film when you need that extra f/stop. Velvia 50 is fantastic too. Both are excellent tools. But like all tools they are not perfect for ever situation and every photographer.

    You should test both side by side to see for yourself. Don't believe what others write as gospel. Only your eye will know what's correct for you.

    Most importantly use a very good E-6 lab.

    All I can say about my experience is that I've used Velvia 100F for my last National Geographic Explorer magazine assignment. The quality was superb, and my client loved the color, saturation and quality.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  5. #5
    copake_ham's Avatar
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    Velvia 100F is a very nice 'chrome. I still have a bunch of rolls in the deep freeze.

    That said, I bought them during the "drought" when the old Velvia 50 was discontinued and before the new Veliva 50 was introduced.

    I like the 100F very much. But, now that you can get the 50 again, if you have the light/right conditions - I'd opt for the 50.

    But it does demand good light.

    In March you might have enough good light for 50 at the Grand Canyon - but the sun angle will still be such that you'll probably be best to shoot it only from mid-morning to mid-afternoon - particulary if you are on the south rim (i.e. with the sun at your back).

    Overall, the 100 will be more versatile during a March GC visit.

    Also, I think the 100 is better with reds than the "old" 50 - so keep that in mind. I don't know about the "new" 50 in this regard.

    Of course, if you really want to "pop" the reds - pick up some recent past date Kodachrome 64 on eBay. If you can find it, Dwayne's still develops it.
    Last edited by copake_ham; 01-28-2008 at 08:05 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6

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    thanks

    thanks to all that replied. i appreciate the info

  7. #7

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    Don't forget that there is also plain Velvia 100 (non-F). Nice film, and probably closer to the 50 than the 100F is. I can't say for certain though, since I've never personally used the 100F. I'm sure others around here can tell you more.

    Quote Originally Posted by ronsine View Post
    I HAVE HEARD THAT VELVIA 100F IS LESS SATURATED THAN VELVIA 50. MOST REVIEWS TELL ME TO STAY AWAY FROM 100F. ONE REVIEW SAID NEVER TO SHOOT "RED ROCK" WITH VELVIA 50. I AM GOING TO THE GRAND CANYON IN MARCH. DOES ANYONE HAVE ANY EXPERIENCE WITH VELVIA 100F THAT COULD ENLIGHTEN ME A LITTLE?

  8. #8
    RH Designs's Avatar
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    I have to disagree with the majority here I'm afraid - I don't like 100F at all. I found it too contrasty and with rather weird colour casts which are difficult to describe but just looked "wrong". I much prefer the standard Velvia 100 (called "100DL" at http://www.fujilab.co.uk where I get all my E6 processing done) which to my eyes at least is closer to the original Velvia 50. I've yet to try the new 50.

    If you're going on an important trip, I recommend you get a sample of each film and try them before you go. Only you can decide which is best for you .
    Regards,
    Richard.

    RH Designs - My Photography

  9. #9

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    I recently used the new 50 100-non-F and 100F in Red Rock Country (Zion, Bryce, Canyonlands, Arches, etc) and would say I prefer the 100F to the others for redrock, especially in reflected light conditions. Absolutely beautiful. I'm mostly a B&W guy, but was very happy with my results.

    Be sure to catch the sunsets every day from a good location. The South Rim looking east into the canyon at sunset is absolutely amazing. The light sweeps over the rock so quickly that the lighting changes constantly, second to second.

  10. #10

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