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  1. #11
    Xax
    Xax is offline

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    Feb 2008
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    Thank you very much for all your answers.

    So I am going to keep the used chemicals seperated from the unused, and use it 3 times perhaps cheat it and use it 4 times

    I am looking for a more economical way to develop C-41 since it's over 5dollar a roll here in the lab, if I do it myself and use the tetenal kit 4 times, I can keep the cost under 2 dollars, which makes it possible for me to shoot twice as much for the same money

    being in the film business without a steady income is not easy if you want to shoot a lot of film!

  2. #12

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    If your film is developed improperly, then you will lose detail. If the film is not properly fixed then it will fade fast. These two chemicals are relative cheap compared to the bleach. I use them as a one shot deal so that my film is fixed and developed with fresh chemicals.

    On the other hand, the bleach is the most expensive part of C41 which runs about 27.00 per gallon not including shipping. I have talked with Kodak technical people and they said you could reuse the bleach once with no harm, but do not mix it back with the fresh stuff. Cycle through with the new bleach and collect it in a separate tank. Once the new is gone then reuse the saved solution only once. This will provide a savings of $13.00.

  3. #13

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    I would repeat my advice to use C41 in a jobo as one shot. I have Kodak flexcolor chemicals and at my usage of 150ml per roll we are not talking great cost for developer. Replenish your fixer if you wish, it will save you money on the most expensive component of developing. The trouble with reusing small quantities of c41 is that you will have small colour shifts in your negatives. If you are printing on to RA4 paper your filtration will be all over the place. I guess if you scan and print digitally the software will compensate for this.

  4. #14
    davidamosphotography's Avatar
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    Mar 2008
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    Can somebody steer me in the right direction of developing my own 120 colour film. What is the chemicals I need and the process.
    Thank you.

  5. #15
    AgX
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    David,

    If these are negative films (primarily to make prints from) you’ll need a kit of type C-41 chemistry, if these are reversal films (yielding directly a positive image, primarily intended for making slides) you’ll need a kit of of type E-6 chemistry.

    Look for these at this forum and you’ll find some some informations about how to use them by hand (with an inverted drum and some temperature bath) as well by mechanical means (rotating processors).

    There is no principal difference in developing type 135 films (35mm) and type 120 films. Basically you only need different (or differently adjusted) reels to spool the films onto for development.

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