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Thread: C-21

  1. #1

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    Does anyone know anyone processing C-21?
    Steve Anchell
    Author:
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    The Variable Contrast Printing Manual
    The Film Developing Cookbook
    The Nude at Big Sur

    www.steveanchell.com

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Rocky Mountain Film Labs does C-22 and claims to be able to handle processes not listed on their website. What films are C-21?
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #3

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    It's probably my memory, but as I recall the pre-C-41 color negative process was C-21. Maybe it was C-22. I'll contact Rocky Mountain and set the record straight. Either way, it's probably what I'm looking for.

    Thank you very much
    Steve Anchell
    Author:
    The Darkroom Cookbook
    The Variable Contrast Printing Manual
    The Film Developing Cookbook
    The Nude at Big Sur

    www.steveanchell.com

  4. #4
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    It's probably C-22, then--Kodacolor X, early Kodacolor, and such. www.rockymountainfilm.com
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  5. #5

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    I know I'm sounding like an idiot, but color negative was never my strong suite. I started photography developing E-3 transparency by hand at 75 degrees and printing Cibachrome.

    As I recall, when I started in photography, and remember, my memory isn't what it used to be, especially for processes I didn't use much, it was C-21 then became C-22 (?) and finally C-41.

    Like I said, I'm going to contact Rocky Mountain (thank you for the link), and find out for certain.
    Steve Anchell
    Author:
    The Darkroom Cookbook
    The Variable Contrast Printing Manual
    The Film Developing Cookbook
    The Nude at Big Sur

    www.steveanchell.com

  6. #6

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    FYI, the film in question is Kodacolor X and it says to develop in C-21.

    I contacted Rocky Mountain and they said they had never heard of C-21, only C-22. That proves that I'm older than I remember. Excuse me while I go have a lie down.
    Steve Anchell
    Author:
    The Darkroom Cookbook
    The Variable Contrast Printing Manual
    The Film Developing Cookbook
    The Nude at Big Sur

    www.steveanchell.com

  7. #7
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Thanks for the update. That's interesting.

    P.S.: I just sent for a 2 year subscription to _Photovision_.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #8
    b.e.wilson's Avatar
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    My 1974 Kodak Color Dataguide lists C-22 and C-41 only. I wonder, did (does) Kodak have any little-known processes, or processes that lasted only a very sort time, particularly color processes?

    The Guide also lists E-3 and E-4 for color transparencies, and Ektaprint 3 and 300 (froom color negs) and Ektaprint R-5 and RD for prints from slides.

    Of all of these, only C-41 remains.

  9. #9
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b.e.wilson
    My 1974 Kodak Color Dataguide lists C-22 and C-41 only. I wonder, did (does) Kodak have any little-known processes, or processes that lasted only a very sort time, particularly color processes?
    I know of one other. One of the issues of Camera and Darkroom had the recipe for "K-14" which I think (don't bet the farm on this) was the process for the latest Kodachrome.
    My! ... A truly involved, complex process. I would not recommend it for "home" use.

    I do have something else - an intact Anscochrome Processing Kit, from the mid '60's. I have fond memories of this ... time has dulled the pain. Eleven little foil packets - mix them all up and comandeer the kitchen sink for a tempering bath. Sixteen processing "steps" - including the reversal exposure (two minutes - three feet from an R2 photoflood lamp - through a transparent film reel..). GALLONS and gallons of washing. The time necessary was something like three and a half hours...
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  10. #10

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    Kodak still offers a webpage on E-4. Including the formulas to brew your own chemicals. So I guess you could say E4 is still out there.

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