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  1. #21
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    1/2 degree is good, and an 8 second drain is included in the development time so you don't have to worry. You can even start 1 degree high and drop to 1 degree low over the 3' 15" development time as the film is designed for that as long as the temperature averages the correct value.

    You can do RA at 68 degrees with RA-RT developer replenisher. I use 2' development.

    PE

  2. #22

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    All these years I've been working blind in the dark, and now I find out that there is a safe safelight for colour printing <sigh>

    Graham

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    A red or red-orange safelight will fog the red layer and produce a cyan fog.

    The amber light was designed specifically to fit a hole in the sensitivity of the paper and allow a safelight that caused no fog.

    PE

  3. #23
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    Yes, wratten series 13 will work just fine. They were designed to fit each other. IDK how well it works with Fuji paper though.

    PE

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbroadbridge View Post
    All these years I've been working blind in the dark, and now I find out that there is a safe safelight for colour printing <sigh>

    Graham

    And a very good one in the form of the sodium DUKA 10 or 50 safelight in terms of good light. I have a DUKA 10 and run it at the recommended level which is low on its spectrum of light intensity but is nearly the same light level as my Ilford 902 B&W safelight.

    Given that the paper is out of the box and under the easel and exposed in a matters of seconds and then straight into the light safe Jobo drum I suspect that I could run the DUKA at a higher level and still not fog but that's an assumption which I haven't tested.

    pentaxuser

  5. #25
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    If I may ask, why is crossover bad? Can't it be compensated for in the enlarger?

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    If I may ask, why is crossover bad? Can't it be compensated for in the enlarger?
    No. Color paper has no yellow filter layer, and the blue sensitive layer is on the bottom. If the red speed and the blue speed are the same, then when you expose to blue light you expose 2 layers instead of 1 layer.

    So, the layers must be separated by enough speed to prevent crosstalk. This is done by the use of the 50R + orange negative mask which prevents crosstalk. So, the Fuji paper is very close to having some increased chance of crosstalk leading to less pure colors.

    As a result, only if you have a 50R filter pack or thereabouts will you have a way you can compensate in the enlarger.

    PE

  7. #27
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    Crossover in film development rather. I've been told that one should not process C41 spec films at the C22 temperature/time specifications because within 5 degrees of 100 you get "crossover"; when one layer is not fully developed while the others are. Can't this be compensated for in an enlarger or (shock) in scanning?

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    Crossover in film development rather. I've been told that one should not process C41 spec films at the C22 temperature/time specifications because within 5 degrees of 100 you get "crossover"; when one layer is not fully developed while the others are. Can't this be compensated for in an enlarger or (shock) in scanning?
    No, it cannot be compensated for in an enlarger, and it is very difficult to compensate for digitally.

    When you get a properly processed film, the negative or transparency for that matter, produces 3 layers in which the dyes have identical contrasts and parallel curves. For an illustration see the product characteristic curves on the Kodak web site or Fuji web site.

    If a film is incorrectly processed, the three curves are not of identical contrast and are not parallel. If laid one on top of another, they cross, and you get crossover. Therefore, if you have say a red object which is not illuminated evenly (goes from light to dark), it might be orange at one side, red in the middle and green at the other side. Trying to correct for the orange to make it red, moves the green to the middle and introduces a gray or blue to the greenish part. It can make a face look pretty awful as one example.

    Even photoshop is rather hardpressed to fix this type of problem and that is why I for one, suggest not getting into that type of situation.

    PE

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