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  1. #11

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    Thats a Gibson Paul custom shop. Its a nice axe but I tragically play my old 64 Tele way more often

  2. #12
    ZoneIII's Avatar
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    Thanks, folks! Those are exactly the kinds of responses I was looking for and they will be very helpful.

    I was aware that the first rinse is very important but I appreciate the reminder because this is new to me and I might have forgotten.

    Until recently, the primary usage of my images was for publication. Magazines would make separations. But recently, I am more involved with making large display prints for hospitals, professional offices, etc. But, for the first time in my life, I'm letting experts do my color printing. Until now, I have done all my printing - color and b&w in a traditional darkroom although I never had a lot of need for color prints. I still print all my b&w in my darkroom and have no plans of going digital with that as long as the materials are available. For color, West Coast Imaging does drum scans and prints them. I don't have the time or money to keep up with digital printing technology. It's an endless chase I am not interested in now and I am extremely happy with WCI's work. I do scan my film too for monitor viewing but I can't match the results that a Tango drum scanner can produce.

    Thanks for the help.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZoneIII View Post
    Darryl then goes on to say that distilled water is very acidic, with a P.H. of 5.7. But then he recommends that you use distilled water for all steps if you doing single-use processing(???).

    Question: Do you recommend that I use distilled water for any or all of my your E6 steps.

    2) JOBO says that you SHOULD NOT rinse the film after the reversal step. They write, "There should be no rinse between the reversal bath and the color developer. The emulsion enters the color developer soaked with the reversal bath." But Darryl highly recommends that a rinse step be used between ALL E6 steps and he's talking about single-use chemistry. But he is emphatic that the film should definitely be rinsed thoroughly after the reversal step while JOBO insists that it shouldn't be rinsed and Kodak shows no rinse step after the reversal step in their process chart. I do know that the reversal bath should be diluted to 60% of it's normal dilution for rotary processing. At least that's one thing that all my sources agree upon. Darryl knows that it should be diluted too so his recommendation to rinse the film after the reversal step assumed the the reversal bath had been diluted as well. (Years ago when I processed my own RA4 prints, I found that a rinse between all steps was a good idea but I reused my RA4 chemistry so I was trying to limit contamination.)

    Question: Is it a good idea to rinse the film after the reversal step or between all steps?
    Distilled water has a pH of 7.0. Period.

    Even if you are using your E-6 chemistry single shot, do not wash between the reversal and color dev, between the color dev and pre-bleach, and especially between the pre-bleach and bleach steps. Color dev, pre-bleach and bleach depend on carryover from the previous steps to work properly.

    On the other hand, inserting a wash step between the bleach and fix steps is A Good Thing, as rinsing off the bleach carryover extends the life of the fixer.

  4. #14

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    By the way...

    By the way, I've extensively edited the Wikipedia entry on the E-6 Process (my user name there is Discpad).

    The info on that page is essentially regurgitated from Kodak Processing Manual Z-119; with extra stuff from the Q-Lab Manual.

    [You can also download the entire manuals in single PDF binder files from my Home Page.]

  5. #15

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    Don't worry about the Ph of distilled water, it's not really important. The real beauty of distilled water is that it has zero ability to buffer against changes in Ph, meaning you can drop a ml of first developer in a liter of distilled and it will immediately take on the full Ph of the developer.

    As far as rinses between steps, there's really only a rinse between the 1st Dev. and the Reversal bath. As Discpad mentioned, you can insert a rinse between the Bleach and fixer; I don't because I'm using the Single Use kit and all the chems get used once and discarded.

    For Fuji Velvia, I use 7:30 as my 1st Dev. time and get good results.

  6. #16
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    As critical as the reversal step? You could use a lightbulb instead! If you're going for absolute consistency than by all means use distilled water. I use tap water. Filtering can't hurt.

    I wasn't aware that ANY solutions in E6 required carry over. The process works by first developing a negative silver image leaving only a positive halide crystal formation which is re-exposed and then developed in a color developer which activates the dye couplers in the positive halide image to form dyes in that shape. Then the silver is bleached to halide and removed in the fix. That is all that is needed. 3 baths and a lightbulb.

    Additional steps are such as stabalizers and chemical fogging agents. NOT NEEDED! but they can help, and provide for greater efficiency!(fact!)

    All in all you're worrying too much. I doubt any E6 lab in the world has as much consistency as you're trying to achieve. In the end, if your film shifts 1cc to magenta is it the end of the world? Just keep the temp and time and agitation set and you'll have no problem.

    The only wash you could care about is between the bleach and fix, but not needed. Chemistry capacity stuff. Wash and stabilize for film life at the end.
    Last edited by tiberiustibz; 04-13-2008 at 09:30 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17

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    Degassed distilled water, or water distilled under argon in platinum apparatus - yes, pH 7.0. The usual kind of distilled water, made in contact with air, has pH about 5.5 - because of carbon dioxide dissolving in it. Try it for yourself with a good pH-meter.

    The statement about the life of fixer is true, but only in case of replenishable kits - here we mean a Kodak single-shot 5l kit, where all chemicals are single-use for better quality.

    Quote Originally Posted by Discpad View Post
    Distilled water has a pH of 7.0. Period.

    On the other hand, inserting a wash step between the bleach and fix steps is A Good Thing, as rinsing off the bleach carryover extends the life of the fixer.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    Additional steps are such as stabalizers and chemical fogging agents. NOT NEEDED! but they can help, and provide for greater efficiency!(fact!)

    All in all you're worrying too much. I doubt any E6 lab in the world has as much consistency as you're trying to achieve. In the end, if your film shifts 1cc to magenta is it the end of the world? Just keep the temp and time and agitation set and you'll have no problem.
    That's perhaps why people sometimes gets so disappointed with their E6 results from some labs - guys like mr. Tiberiustibz are overestimating the robustness of E6, and omit the whole steps. Well, of course, all those crazy engineers at kodak and Fuji with their pesky strips and densitometers are talking too high, and putting too much stock in science just to sell you a couple of unneeded bottles, right )))))

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