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  1. #11
    Mick Fagan's Avatar
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    I agree with JD that you require it in the neg first. With Reala I have shot it at 100 or 80 and push processed ½ a stop for high contrast fashion type stuff.

    Push processing is 3.15 standard 3.45 1 stop and 4.15 2 stops.

    Mick.

  2. #12

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    Also, don't forget that high contrast/saturation is a double-edged sword. People generally flock to a high contrast bold look, and it's very easy to prefer that print in an A-B comparison with a more natural-looking scene.

    John Sexton has said that many printers, especially new ones, tend to print too contrasty (and too dark). It's the same with digital photographers who use too much sharpening. It's such candy for the eye and it's hard to look at it any other way after you've seen it bumped up that way. But I guarantee that after a few years (or hopefully less!) you'll see the garishness.

  3. #13
    jd callow's Avatar
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    Mick is correct regarding contrast, but that will only get you saturation at the upper end -- this is a good example of where saturation and contrast will go their separate ways. PVia is also correct that digital printers and I believe commercial print processors (frontiers, noritsu and what ever Kodak uses) will tend toward contrast and saturation. I believe this is due to market preference and as a way to rescue slightly to really badly exposed negs. I've printed with Kodak's consumer papers (edge and I think royal) and they seemed to have the most punch of any paper. I can't be sure of this last bit as I've printed from just about every paper I could get my hands on, but didn't take notes for most. I've noticed with digital camera's or at least the few I've used that they do seem to boost the saturation a bit and they tend not to have a toe or shoulder and therefore are more contrasty then film. With the Nikon there are settings for natural (NL), medium (SL which is the default) and vivid (VL). The NL setting is similar to the way film renders saturation, the default, SL, is like a chrome and the vivid is over the top to the point that shooting monochromatic subjects can create weird colour shifts and colour noise as it searches for something to boost. This leads me to believe that PVia and Sexton are correct that the digital market feels that you can never have too much cow bell.

    *

  4. #14
    davetravis's Avatar
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    Plan B which has come to my attention is to switch to slide printing with the old ilfochrome. I would shoot velvia and print from that. Any experiences/suggestions? I'm thinking of sending a slide off to be printed for me to see how it compares. I don't know how far I want to go and if I end up needing contrast masking I may just bail.

    Hi there.
    Velvia onto ciba polyester is the richest image I produce.
    I'm happy with most values rendered, and don't use contrast masks. The older and now defunct fiber paper was rich, but a little less contrasty.
    All we are saying, is give ciba a chance.
    DT

  5. #15
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    IF you can still find them => Kodak UltraColor 100 and Kodak UltraColor 400. I brought up all I could find to keep it from the hoarders!

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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