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Thread: Wedding Film

  1. #21
    GeoffHill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoxNewsCritic View Post
    Geoff:

    You didn't indicate what glass you have! If your glass is no faster than f/2.8, then I would use Fuji Pro 800Z and expose at EI 640.

    Only if your glass is about f/1.8 or faster should you venture down into the 160 to 400 film speed range inside a church.
    I've got a 50 1.8, 85 1.8, as well as a 70-200 2.8 IS, the IS lets me use the lens about 2 stops slower than the non-IS version, so as long as the subject is relatively static, its effectivly the fastest lens I have.

    I don't have any quick short lenses, only a 17-40 f/4, which I'll probably be using for the outside group shots.

    Would it be sensible to take 400 NC and VC, and pick which film depending on if its a sunny day, or an overcast day?

    I'll buy a few rolls of fuji 800Z as well and try it out.

    thanks for all the advice so far guys

    Geoff

  2. #22
    Matt5791's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeoffHill View Post
    I've got a 50 1.8, 85 1.8, as well as a 70-200 2.8 IS, the IS lets me use the lens about 2 stops slower than the non-IS version, so as long as the subject is relatively static, its effectivly the fastest lens I have.

    I don't have any quick short lenses, only a 17-40 f/4, which I'll probably be using for the outside group shots.

    Would it be sensible to take 400 NC and VC, and pick which film depending on if its a sunny day, or an overcast day?

    I'll buy a few rolls of fuji 800Z as well and try it out.

    thanks for all the advice so far guys

    Geoff

    Don't get bogged down in taking too many different emulsions - as someone else metioned it is a minor consideration really. You will thank yourself for keeping it simple, and I would strongly recommend taking just Portra 400NC and HP5.

    Personally when shooting groups I use a traditional method of Medium format camera on tripod (+ joke and lighten the group up to relax them and make them less self concious). MF imparts a certain grandeur to more formal shots, because of the added detail in the negative and also, I think, the longer focal lengths and the effect this has on DOF vis a vis angle of view.

    So if you can get hold of MF to use for the formals I would recommend you do because I personally don't shoot formals on 35mm mainly because MF is just so much better, and designed for, these type of shots, and I know what I would be missing - a camera with a waist level finder is ideal so you can maintain eye contact with the subjects easily.

    If you do use 35mm, I wouldn't have thought a 17-40mm lens was very suited to formals, unless you want to impart some sort of wide angle effects - if anything a 50mm is fine. Again best to keep it simple.

  3. #23
    GeoffHill's Avatar
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    I have a Hassy 501CM with an 80mm 2.8 CFE lens, would I be better off using this for the formals then? I hadn't planned taking any MF gear, and was just going to use 35mm.

    I'm a smidge worried about carting around loads of crap, and spending more time deciding on what to use, rather than getting on with taking pictures, but MF for formals, and 35mm for everything else is a simple enough formula for me to follow in my head

  4. #24
    Matt5791's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeoffHill View Post
    I have a Hassy 501CM with an 80mm 2.8 CFE lens, would I be better off using this for the formals then? I hadn't planned taking any MF gear, and was just going to use 35mm.

    I'm a smidge worried about carting around loads of crap, and spending more time deciding on what to use, rather than getting on with taking pictures, but MF for formals, and 35mm for everything else is a simple enough formula for me to follow in my head
    Definitely right to be worried about carrying too much - but the 501 with 80mm is absolutely ideal for formals. I would also suggest composing in the square format - I find this tends to suit formals - rather than cropping to a rectangle afterwards.

    Once you mount this on a tripod you can really communicate with the subjects without being hidden behind the prism of a 35mm/dslr camera. All the formal shots on my website were shot this way. It also means you can develop a good rapport with the subject very quickly because you can leave the camera on the tripod in position, whilst walking around, arranging people and making light conversation.

    Matt

  5. #25
    Gary Holliday's Avatar
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    If you have the Hassy 501 then use that for formal shots...bring it out after the ceremony. I work this way also, MF for tradtionally arranged groups and 35mm B&W for the documentary work.

    It's important to use the one film so that each photo has the same look throughout the album.

  6. #26

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    Dear Geoff,

    Your Hasselblad with the 80mm lens is just right for the garden shots - what we call formals over here - and is surprisingly easy to use if you are not encumbered with other equipment. I use mine for ALL the wedding pictures. I need to use an on-camera flash to fill against the harsh Australian sunshine and have settled on a Metz unit suspended about 12 inches above the lens axis. The rigout is a little heavy at the end of the evening but the flash synch is available at all speeds and the evenness of the exposures makes later darkroom work a breeze.

    Film? Kodak Portra 160 NC and 400NC rated respectively at 125 ISO and 320 ISO. It will keep skin tones real and still record the white and black of the traditional clothing.

    How many pictures to do? An average wedding uses 12-13 rolls and is charged accordingly. Using your Hasselblad means that you will be more careful and most of your shots will be wanted and printed.

    Uncle Dick

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob champagne View Post
    But again, [by scanning] you are introducing scan and limitation of jpeg files so the benefit of film is debateable.
    In a nutshell, if you are printing digitally to photo paper, then the benefit of film is dubious and it will cost more to do. That, as I understand it, is one of the major reasons why a lot of wedding photographers went digital, because the labs went digital and the scan process is usually crap.
    i.e. do it digitally unless you are printing direct from film to photo paper or unless you want to pay for high quality scans.
    Eeeh, no. Film handles much better than digital, it's easier to shoot as you will have MUCH more flexibility when printing (use the program automatic mode and all is happy), and it will provide higher quality.

    They went digital because:
    A. Everyone else was going digital
    B. Digital Cameras happen to be happier at higher ISOs, good indoors
    C. It was easier and cheaper on a project to project basis

    The downside to digital is not JPG compression, you can scan in tiff, and the minilab scanners are very good. JPG, provided the compression setting is not too low for the relative complexity of the image, is an AMAZING file format which can greatly reduce file size with no loss in bit depth, resolution, or significant quality. Unless you are enlarging to 20x30 from your 6 megapixel camera, there's really no difference between JPG and RAW.

    The downside to digital (among issues of sudden deletion of files, this happens with all cameras) is the linear response of the chip. It handles highlights like dog crap, but trades this off for better shadow detail. Digital cameras are also inherantly VERY sharp and saturated. Not all people want diamond tipped sharp images with colors off the wall.

    By all means shoot it digital. That little catch that you can get clear images at 6400 ISO with a D3 happens to be a VERY BIG CATCH.

  8. #28

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    Geoff,
    couple of things, I find if the weather is overcast and grey then consumer film like superia 400 is the best choice and preferred by the wedding parties. Pro film can be a bit dull in English conditions however: if the sun is shining brightly you will need pro film. So lots of film available on the day seems to be a given.
    Secondly, where possible use the same film speed whatever you use. 400iso is the natural choice. HP5, Superia 400 and 400H. The metering and changing medium format backs etc can be a nightmare if you have lots of different speeds going on. The Hassy will give you fantastic big blow ups using all the above films but the 35mm will need careful cropping in camera so you do not need to be too selective at the printing stage. A zoom on the 35mm helps here a lot. Good luck and be reasonably assertive, nobody will naturally co-opertate with the snapper but they will do what they are told. be quick but careful. Guests enjoy the day and are not put off by hanging around for the photographer as long as the shot happens.

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