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  1. #1
    juan's Avatar
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    I've retrieved my grandmother's old 127 camera from the closet and want to fool around with it. It has two ranges for exposure, one for Anscochrome Daylight or Kodacolor and the other for Super Anscochrome. The camera was made in 1958-59, so I'm assuming the Anscochrome Daylight and Kodacolor was in the range of ASA 32-64.

    I've found one refernece to Super Anscochrome that says it was factory rated at ASA 100. Does anyone know?

    I'm interested because if the Super Anscochrome was rated at ASA 100, I can use the camera with modern films. The camera is not adjustable other than between these two settings.
    Thanks,
    Juan

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    You could test it using the "sunny 16" rule. Go outside on a sunny day and meter a grey card at f:16, and the film speed will be 1/shutter speed. So if you get 1/100 at the "Super Anscochrome" setting, then it's presuming that "Super Anscochrome" is an ISO 100 film.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #3
    juan's Avatar
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    Well, I thought about that, but I have no shutter setting nor f/stop settings nor meterr readings, so I have nothing to measure. Only the two gross settings - one for Kodacolor and the other for the Super Anscochrome.

    I'll probably just have to order a roll of the 100ASA film from JandC and just see what happens.

    thanks,
    juan

  4. #4
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    If there is no meter or settings, then what does the switch control? Are you sure it isn't just a dial meant to remind you of what film is in the camera? That would be pretty common on cameras of that vintage.

  5. #5
    juan's Avatar
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    This is getting into more detail than I had planned, but here goes. The camera is a Bell and Howell Electric Eye 127. It uses a photocell to control an infinitely variable f/stop. There's no way to control it manually. There is one shutter speed. I suspect the switch is changing the light sensitivity of the photocell and, thus, the range of f/stops - one range for slower film, another range for faster films. There are no markings to show f/stops nor any indication of what the shutter speed is, so I'm not aware of any way to do computations.

    The reason for my question is this - 100-speed film is still available, so if the Super Anscochrome setting was for 100ASA film, I can possibly still use the camera. I'll buy a roll of the modern film and see what happens.

    Thanks for your help.
    juan

  6. #6

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    When did the ASA rating system change? It doubled around that time I think. So 50ASA speed film then would equal 100 now. Then you've got the fact people will pull film.

  7. #7
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Zounds ... I just checked. I have one (1) 20 exposure cartridge of "Super Anscochrome Tungsten Type". The only other printing on the cartridge is "Open Only In Total Darkness". Nothing about speed.
    Hah!! It took a little digging - but in "The Encyclopedia of Photography", Volume 5, page 772, there is an entry for 1957 - "Super Anscochrome - ASA 100". Doesn't say a *thing* about "Tungsten Type".

    I have, on this desk, an "Ansco Color Developing Outfit - For Anscochrome Film", complete with instructions. Talk about memories ... commandeering the kitchen sink for use as a tempering bath to keep everything at 68F...
    This must date back to the early '60's.

    The processing starts: "1. First developer. 16 1/2 minutes at 68F ...", and continues for a total of 17 steps, including the reversal exposure.

    The whole process took *hours* and gallons and gallons of water.
    Eveery once in a while, I am tempted - one cartridge of Anscochrome - and one Developing Kit ... But no, I'll keep them as mementos of better (?) - earlier days.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  8. #8
    juan's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. I had forgotten about the ASA change. It was about 1960. As the only film still made in 127 is ISO 100, I guess I'll just have to run a roll through the camera and see if it works.

    It would be nice to shake up my camera club by entering a couple of superslides in the next competition. Ha.
    juan



 

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