Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,745   Posts: 1,515,644   Online: 791
      
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    104

    New Velvia 50 - "true ISO"?

    Hello all,

    A couple of years ago I bought every remaining 120 roll and 4x5 sheet of the old Velvia 50 on the planet - or so my wife thought anyway. Since then I have been happily working through my stockpile.

    I am about to shoot some of the new Velvia 50 for the first time.

    I have always exposed the old 50 at ISO 40 - I found that produced fewer underexposures and worked better for various unmentionable post-processing activities that may not be discussed on APUG (ahem).

    To experienced users of the new Velvia 50 - what do you think is its "true" ISO - 40 or 50?

    NB: I put the word "true" in quotation marks to show that I know these things are subjective and to avoid some of the religious debates that have occasionally arisen on this subject. And please don't say "try it for yourself and make up your own mind" either because I am heading off overseas on Saturday and will not have the chance to run off and process a test roll first.

    So for those reasons the informed opinions of my fellow APUGers will be of great interest.

    regards

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    119
    probably 40 but I use 50 anyway. If I expose two trannies, one with provia and one with new Velvia, the new Velvia seems around (or slightly under) 1/3 stop underexposed..

  3. #3
    tim_walls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Croydon & Leeds
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,037
    Images
    48
    The new Velvia is pretty much identical in every respect to the old one as far as I can tell - noone has yet been able to explain exactly what's new about it, other than they restarted manufacturing; anyway, to answer the question I've shot a little recently and stuck to ISO40 with the expected results.

    I don't shoot much Velvia though because I find all Fuji's E6 films much harder to do-that-thing-we're-not-allowed-to-mention with than Kodak's; shooting V at 40 definitely helps that. That said, I develop all my E6 for the same time; some people recommend extending the first developer time of Fuji E6 - I presume that's just another way of achieving the same end (i.e. either shoot at a lower ISO, or extend first dev) - I'd be curious to know if I've misunderstood though.
    Another day goes under; a little bourbon will take the strain...

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    74
    My results indicate that if anything there is an extremely slight gain in speed, maybe 1/4-stop. I still shoot it at 50, like I did the old. Enjoy it - I'm having a great year shooting 'original' Velvia knowing that I can always buy more.

  5. #5
    wildbill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,376
    Images
    140
    I don't shoot much Velvia though because I find all Fuji's E6 films much harder to do-that-thing-we're-not-allowed-to-mention with than Kodak's; shooting V at 40 definitely helps that.

    Funny, i've found the exact opposite but i'm using a drum sca*ner.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  6. #6
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    I would use the term "Exposure Index" instead of "True ISO."

    The ISO of a film is what it is. It is measured according to a very particular standard, and is true (without the quotes) to the standard.

    You don't change the "ISO" of a film when you expose it differently. You change your "Exposure Index."

    That said, I'm sorry that I don't have much to contribute to your question! I haven't had a chance to use the New Velvia yet.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    104
    Thanks everyone. I will leave the meter set at 40 (ISO/EI). In due course I will post my own informed opinion as to the most appropriate setting.

    cheers

    Stewart

  8. #8
    AutumnJazz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    730
    Scanning?

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    41
    It was my understanding, you can best verify by a term search here, that the old V-50 required some nasty upfront chemistry not needed by the 100.

    Fuji thought that 50 users would readily migrate to 100 only to find an outcry.

    To F's credit, the reformulated V-50 in response.

    It "hit" the UK market about a year ago and has had quite a mystique here in NA.

    Some folk here such as Naturephoto and Robert (roteague) are LF Velvians and sometimes check in here.

    They can probably give you some good insight as to V-50 exposure settings...

    You might try PM'ing them.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin