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  1. #1

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    C-41 and Slides?

    I know that prints can be made from slides but can slides be made from print film? Just was curious.

  2. #2

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    C41 film has an orange-yellow filter in the emulsion and though they can be proccesed in E6 chemistry the results look a bit odd.
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  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The Cine industry uses a positive print film so yes it can be done.

    Whether it's practical is another mater. Probably a better modern option is scanning and re-writing with a film writer.

    Ian

  4. #4
    dmr
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    Kodak used to actually have "Kodacolor Slide" branded slides that were made from color negatives.

    I don't know if any labs offer a similar service today.

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    I have some slides taken by my late Father in the 1970's, made from 35mm colour negs by the Kodak (UK) service which was available at that time.
    Presumably they were printed onto positive stock similar to that used for movie release prints.
    The quality is reasonable (no real signs of fading) but nothing like as good his Kodachromes from the same time.
    A pro lab might still offer the service if you really needed slides from negs?

  6. #6

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    Hmmm

    Well I had read somewhere that this is possible and the reason I asked is the Cine industry. I've read some of their filmstock names and many of them say "negative" whereas we all are used to it being a "positive" for slides. I think it would be neat if they would come up with a product that did both. In other words when you get it developed you'd check "slides" or "prints". I guess they make C-41 that can be processed B&W looks like they could come up with something like I propose. This way film would be much easier to get versus ordering it the way we do now.

  7. #7

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    I think Rollei has a film called Scanfilm?? that should be both Color and B&W and both pos and Neg. I also think Roger Hicks and Frances Schults did a test and found it not very good. But thats another story and not what youre after
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  8. #8
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Kevin the link in my first reply should indicate what films are available. In the US there were companies selling Cine film in small quantities and they definitely sold the negative & positive films so that you could obtain conventional prints and get slides.

    Ian

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    There was a commercial film from Kodak in 5x4 format which I used extensively years ago.

    I still have about 5 boxes in the freezer. It's called, "Kodak Vericolor Print Film". The product code number is 4111.

    This film is exposed under tungsten light, (an enlarger) then processed in the normal C41 process. It is a brilliant film, when clients requested colour transparencies (slides) that had to shot under different coloured light sources, or it was virtually impossible to get a reasonable colour balance using correction filters, one shot on colour negative, then manufactured colour corrected, density correct, colour transparency for the art director, or whomever wished to have film for whatever purpose.

    This isn't exactly what you wished to know, but more or less this is how it is, and was done. I believe that most colour film cinematography is shot with colour negative, then the fully developed neg film is then sandwiched in a machine with colour print film, to make transparencies for film projection in a cinema.

    You basically need to get some of that print film stock for your purposes. In fact I believe that this film is reasonably responsible for quite a lot of the profit that Kodak makes from their analogue film production.

    Mick.

  10. #10

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    AFAIK it's not possible to have a single film directly produce both negatives and positives -- that is, you process it and pull both negatives and positives from the tank. As others have said, though, it is possible to produce slides from negatives, much as you produce prints from negatives. Dale Labs and PhotoWorks are two commercial photofinishers that offer this service. In years past, they'd do it by contact printing a film strip or using a slide-copying setup onto a film made for this purpose. My hunch is they now do it digitally, but I'm not positive of that.

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