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  1. #1

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    Cool Second Image from Fuji FP 100C45!

    Yesterday I was using Fuji FP 100C in 4x5 for the first time. Beautiful film, excellent fit and finish on the Fuj PA45 holder, etc. I got distracted and didn't peel one of the films for about an hour. Not only was there a positive, but under the goo on the "sender" sheet was a copper colored positive image. I peeled away all the backing paper, washed the goo off in cold water, then dried the sheet. I scanned the image, but it has faded away overnight. Does anyone know how to preserve this image? Is there a way to coat/treat the sender sheet chemically?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Fuji FP-100C 45 Peeled Late.jpg  

  2. #2
    keithwms's Avatar
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    That is very cool indeed. I wouldn't know what to suggest about preserving the image, perhaps running it through pH buffer? But presumably your wash would have gotten the pH almost neutral.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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    Bump... calling all chemists and PE......

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    This calls for some experimentation, did you try fixing it?
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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    Quote Originally Posted by keithwms View Post
    This calls for some experimentation, did you try fixing it?
    It is color, (about which I know nothing) and the package clearly indicates that the "goo" is alkaline. After washing, I did a rinse in half-strength buffered stop bath to neutralize any remaining goo, another water rinse, followed by a bath using stabilizer from a Tetenal E-6 kit. That image lasted for about 24 hours before fading. My best result so far is from putting the washed sheet in a dark, cold freezer - but that isn't a practical longer term solution.

    I'm wondering if a C41 or E6 fix or bleach-fix might be the ticket, but don't have any to try, so some guidance from our resident chemists would be very welcome.

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    Well, in a normal instant product like this, you get a negative silver image and a residual negative dye image that remains in place with yellow on top and then magenta and cyan. You also get a weak positive dye image that has partially migrated to the top and which stops when you peel the sheets apart.

    I assume you are seeing the residuals that I describe. It probably turns black for two reasons. First is that development goes on and you get total black silver and second the carbon in the base becomes the 'reflective' support for the coating and is opaque when dry.

    I have seen the same effect on Kodak PR10 when you peel it apart while imaging. We used to do this for analysis, but since the chemistry was totally different we saw a positive silver image and a negative dye image, just the reverse of what you show above.

    Best I can do without trying some experiments myself.

    PE



 

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