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  1. #1
    Stephen Frizza's Avatar
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    E-6 Reversal Colour test.

    Ok Im curious about an aspect of re exposure rather than chemical fogging to reverse E-6 film. if you were to filter the light source to specific wavelengths of light rather than full spectrum or if you give the light a colour bias how dramatically does it effect colour balance in the film? and can this be used for creative application?

    Has anyone done this? any examples?

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    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    It may or may not be possible. It would rely on the ability of the sensitzing dye to remain in the emulsion during first development. Kodachrome dyes are specially selected to stick to grains, but I don't remember if any of the Ektachrome dyes do.

    The only way to find out is to try.

    PE

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    Domin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Frizza View Post
    Ok Im curious about an aspect of re exposure rather than chemical fogging to reverse E-6 film. if you were to filter the light source to specific wavelengths of light rather than full spectrum or if you give the light a colour bias how dramatically does it effect colour balance in the film? and can this be used for creative application?

    Has anyone done this? any examples?
    I assume you mean reexposure within a processor, on rack, reel, and not washing, drying and then some time/intensity controlled exposure i.e. in camera, contact printer or enlarger.

    If I understand the whole process correctly at that point the film has three positive silver halogen images in three layers and each layer is sensitive "one" color (some band of spectrum). If you do not use something like a kodachrome processor I don't think you can control reexposure - its either uneven fogging or complete. So the only thing that is possible to control is spectrum of the light which makes possible to control each layer separately but again its either none, complete or uneven and unpredictable fogging.

    As much as I'm into such film abuse I suspect the whole thing would not be much different than just shooting through a filter.



 

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