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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Ummm, I wet my sponges with stabilzer to wipe the film down. Wetting with water will dilute the stabilzer by a fair amount.

    PE
    PE, I was instructing on how to clean the sponges before using them for b/w film. I always rinse out my sponges before use as it softens them up. Then I dip the sponges in photoflo (for b/w) or final rinse/stabilizer (for various color) then wring them out and wipe the film. The only moisture on the sponges at the time of wiping the film is the appropriate "final rinse". Since I use the same set of sponges for all film, I rinse them out thoroughly before each use.

  2. #12
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Sorry.

    The method you describe is exactly what I use and what I had referred to.

    PE

  3. #13
    Resoman's Avatar
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    Thanks to all who advised me prior to my first attempt at processing XP2 Super film in C41 chemistry at home. I processed six rolls of 120 XP2 Super film on Friday and it went quite well, so far as I can tell. Maintaining the 102F temperature wasn't all that difficult, and I was able to sponge the film before hanging it to dry, as I do with conventional b&w film.

    I've gotten as far as making proof sheets and the results look good, with perhaps a bit more contrast than I'm used to in lab processed film.

    Thanks again,

    Gary,
    East Snook, TX

  4. #14
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    So, newby question, what type of sponges are you guys talking about?
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #15
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    The soft 3x4 inch yellow sponges you get at the supermarket will do.

    PE

  6. #16
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Thanks PE

    Mark
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Resoman View Post
    Maintaining the 102F temperature wasn't all that difficult,
    Thanks again,

    Gary,
    East Snook, TX
    Gary,
    Could you elaborate on your technique on the temp stability. I am thinking od trying C41 at home as well and would like to get away with purchasing very little extra stuff than what I already have for my B&W film.

    I've always been put off from c41 due to the temperature issue.

    Anyone else want to through their 2 cents as well.

    Thanks.

  8. #18

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    Just a note. The temperature issue is more critical for C-41 COLOR film, than for C-41 chromogenic b/w film. You can be "off" a bit more with the b/w and still get good negatives. The reason for this is that the b/w only has one dye that has to form, while the color film has three color dye forming layers and they all have to form at once within a set amount of time and be more or less "equal" in their development,..so the film will balance within normal color-balance parameters.

  9. #19
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    It's amazing what a search on Google will bring you on APUG. I just processed my first two rolls of C-41 film (Superia 200) yesterday, and I was thrilled with the results. But after the film dried I have an abundance of drying marks all over the film, probably from the stabilizer. So I'll use the sponges next time.
    I used the JoBo Press Kit, and from what I can tell, besides the drying marks, it worked really really well. It would be interesting to know if there is any difference in ultimate film quality between the various C-41 kits out there.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #20

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    The problem is the stabilizer or final rinse you used for sure. I don't have water marks on my films and I don't use a sponge. I only hang my films to dry in my bathroom. I use Kodak chemicals and that of course includes Kodak final rinse.

    I like Kodak Portra 400VC medium format (220 mostly) very much. This is my all around national parks film. With quality processing this film's grain is very decent despite people bad mouth a bit about its grains. The colors of 400VC is plenty beautiful to me. It's the best film for me on sunny days. I think I am talking about the older 400VC, not the latest that is related to 400UC.

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