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  1. #11
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    But the e6 kit color developer doesn't have the chemical fogger... it's just a CD3 developer, which is, at least, similar to the ECN2 developer. I would use it one shot with light agitation.

  2. #12
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Then go ahead and ignore my advice!

    E6 color developer contains ethylene diamine, which is a silver halide solvent! It also contains citrazinic acid which is a "colorless" coupler. It actually forms a soluable cyan dye which washes out of the film. Either of these will affect color negative development adversely.

    There are other ingredients that interfere with negative color development but assist reversal color development, but I think I have made my point.

    Oh, the pH of the ECN color developer is about 10.x whereas the E6 color developer is abou 11.x. I forget the actual decimal values but the first two digits should give you a small hint.

    PE

  3. #13

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    I spotted an interesting result where ECN-2 motion picture film was processed in C-41 chemistry.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/jonatha...7614573399785/

    There is some reticulation but surely that would be caused by temperature issues rather than chemistry.

    Overall the results look very good IMHO.

    He used:
    "Tetenal C-41 kit from B&H and processed according to the supplied directions in a Paterson jobo tank."
    "Once the film had dried completely, I took a wet cloth and sihttp://www.cinematography.com/index.php?showtopic=37036&hl=mply wiped off the rem-jet backing. "

    There is more written at:
    http://www.cinematography.com/index....opic=37036&hl=

    Cheers,
    Emulsion.

  4. #14
    Aurum's Avatar
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    Certainly a Pastel look which I suspect is from the inherant low contrast, but not that shoddy by any means
    "Flatter Me, and I May Not Believe You. Criticize Me, and I May Not like You. Ignore Me, and I May Not Forgive You. Encourage Me, and I Will Not Forget You."

  5. #15
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    For remjet backing I use sodium sulphite in water. I've given up on this process though.

  6. #16

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    SD-49 is the listed developer:

    Kodak SD-49
    Color negative motion picture film developer for Process ECN-2

    Water (21 – 38C) 850 ml
    Kodak Anti-Calcium No. 4 2 ml
    Sodium sulfite (anh) 2 g
    Sodium bromide (anh) 1.2 g
    Sodium carbonate (anh) 25.6 g
    Sodium bicarbonate 2.7 g
    CD-3 4 g
    Kodak Antifoggant AF-2000 5 ml
    Water to make 1 l

    pH at 25C = 10.25; density = 1.029

    Develop 3 minutes at 41.1C (106F)

    PE's comments about contrast and stability should be taken seriously. If you are going to scan the negatives, motion picture film negative will probably work.

  7. #17

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    Photo-Therm gives instructions for developing ECN-2 film using C-41 chemicals in their processor.

    The Remjet coating is an issue. In a conventional C-41 process this might foul the solutions. However, Photo-Therm is a one-shot processor, so fouling due to the Remjet coating should not be much of an issue, at least not according to the Photo-Therm people.

    I don't know if the quality is any good. However, Photo Engineer consistently warns against developing ECN-2 film using C-41 chemistry, and he probably knows better than any of us.

  8. #18

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    A few samples of ECN prints

    These are scanned 8x10s and the only adjustments are to match the print as close as possible. I've been working with ECN films (Kodak and Fuji) and come up with two different processes. One for high contrast and one for low contrast. The high contrast process uses the standard C-41 process at a slightly reduced temperature and standard times, and the low contrast process uses RA4 at normal temperature and a three minute develop time. Extended RA4 developing time will likely increase contrast, but I have not tried it yet. I have used: Fuji 8563 250iso daylight, Fuji 8592 500iso daylight, Fuji 8522 64isodaylight and Kodak 5201 64iso daylight.

    As explained in an another post, the remjet is no problem at all if you are using the developer as a one-shot. 11x14 prints show no hint of leftover or embedded remjet. Another interesting "feature" of ECN processed in C-41 is the ability to achieve incredible speeds. Starting with the Fuji 500d, I was able to achieve a calculated 64,000iso. The image is handheld, after midnight during a full moon. The color is off a bit and won't fully correct. Reds and blues are very muted while yellow and green is dominant. This image is handheld and looks almost like daylight but it's not.

    End result: ECN films can be had for about 10 cents a foot and in many different speeds, color and B&W. Short ends are always a bargain and easy to respool into a bulk loader. Experiment, and have fun.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails conlow1.jpg   conlow2.jpg   contrast1.jpg   contrast2.jpg   nightshot.jpg  


  9. #19

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    Cruzingoose those are great results! Congratulations.

    You mentioned that the C-41 was at a slightly lower temperature. What did you find worked best?

    Did you use a Tetanal or other kit? How many baths did you use?

    Thanks from,
    Emulsion
    Last edited by Emulsion; 05-24-2009 at 06:57 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post

    ... picture color negative is built to have a contrast (gamma) of 0.50 and ... is way too low for conventional color print materials...

    PE
    Could you push process the ECN-2 film in C-41 chemistry to get the contrast up to "normal" values for conventional print materials?

    If so, I assume that this might introduce a color shift. If so, could one make some adjustment, such as altered pH to re-balance the color shift?

    I am assuming single-shot processing here.

    Thanks.

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