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  1. #1
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    ECN 2 psuedo process

    How might I process ECN2 without the chemistry if I don't want to send it out. What color developer does it use? Can ammonia be used to remove the remjet backing?

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    Ammonia cannot be used to remove the rem-jet backing.

    The process is posted here somewhere.

    PE

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    Check this post for the ECN-II formula, assuming you're willing to mix it from scratch. If not, I've heard of people successfully using C-41 chemistry, but I've never done this myself, and I suspect there'd be color shifts and perhaps reduced color stability over the long haul.

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    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    It uses the same CD as E6 film...

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    Remjet Remover

    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    How might I process ECN2 without the chemistry if I don't want to send it out. What color developer does it use? Can ammonia be used to remove the remjet backing?
    For Remjet removal, mix 1 teaspoon of Borax or Sodium Sulfite per gallon, then use as presoak at room temp for 1 minute. Rinse using two complete water changes then develop.

    I use Kodak Flexicolor C-41 developer at 85 degrees for 3 minutes.

    1 liter mix: 900mL water, 75mL part A, 12mL part B, 12mL part C.

    Use as One-Shot and will develop 4 rolls of 35mm at once in a Kindermann Tank.

    Fill and drain tank several times using tap water close to developer temp, This will remove any leftover traces of remjet and then bleach/fix as with any C-41 film.

    After film is hangiing to dry, fold a paper towel 3 times in half, then drag it down the front (non-emulsion) side of the film. This will remove any hints of remjet and your film will dry spot free.

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    Just remember that motion picture color negative is built to have a contrast (gamma) of 0.50 and therefore is way too low for conventional color print materials. It is only truly compatible with motion picture print stock.

    PE

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    ECN Contrast

    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Just remember that motion picture color negative is built to have a contrast (gamma) of 0.50 and therefore is way too low for conventional color print materials. It is only truly compatible with motion picture print stock.

    PE

    Sorry PE, I have to disagree. When I process the Kodak or Fuji movie stock I have in standard C-41, the contrast and color saturation is incredible. That is why I use a reduced developer temperature to reduce the harshness.

    As far as printing, yes, it does print using an odd filter pack to get "normal" tones on paper.

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    I would not know about the results from C-41 other than to say that the dye hues would not be correct. Comparing CD3 and CD4 dyes, the CD4 dyes are generally shifted to longer wavelengths and are broader. They also have worse dye stability. Now, this is not so if the couplers are chosen to be specific to the given developing agent. So, CD4 films have different couplers designed to be "correct" with their own developing agent.

    The film is "coupler limited" to give this low contrast, so I would expect that there will be some limit you cannot exceed, and even what you are doing should give some crossover.

    You might try shooting a step wedge and then plotting the results to see what is going on there. You might be surprised.

    PE

  9. #9
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    If this is relevant I'm shooting super 8 movie film which I will transfer using some digital camera with a magnifying glass and a cannibalized super 8 viewer. I plan to process it by winding it around a 3 inch PVC pipe with wire guides which I plan to assemble and stick in a larger enclosed pvc pipe. If I remove the remjet after a prebath it will be in the dark for every single one of the 50 feet blind with an old t shirt. As such I'm considering skipping the prebath and removing the remjet after the stop.

    So should I use the E6 CD3 color dev or the C41 dev which has CD4 but which I have about 10 gallons of?

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    You will get rem-jet carbon in the developer, and this will probably get into the gelatin and cause bad black defects in the image (if any). If you use the E6 color developer, it will cause severe fog.

    PE

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