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  1. #11

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    I have some Ektachromes older than me (50 yers) that look fine. But they must have been kept cool. Just one summer in a hot attic, and pre-E-6 Ektachrome is pink mush.

  2. #12

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    Rather than start a new thread, I thought I would add my question to this one. I've bought a couple of collections of Kodachromes on eBay, both from the very early 1960's. In one collection the slides have the month and year printed on one corner, Jul 63 and Jul 64 in this case. In the other collection there are no dates on the slides and the only dating evidence I've found is one picture of the Queen visiting Naples, which Google tells me was in May 1961. So my question is, did Kodachrome slides start to have the dates printed on them some time between 1961 and 1963? These were processed in England, if that makes a difference.

    My other question is about Kodachromes in grey cardboard mounts with a red border. I have 4 like that in the first collection I mentioned, and I guess they are earlier than the ones in white mounts with the red and yellow Kodak graphic in the corner. What year did that change?

    Many thanks

    Kevin

  3. #13
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdanks View Post
    Rather than start a new thread, I thought I would add my question to this one. I've bought a couple of collections of Kodachromes on eBay, both from the very early 1960's. In one collection the slides have the month and year printed on one corner, Jul 63 and Jul 64 in this case. In the other collection there are no dates on the slides and the only dating evidence I've found is one picture of the Queen visiting Naples, which Google tells me was in May 1961. So my question is, did Kodachrome slides start to have the dates printed on them some time between 1961 and 1963? These were processed in England, if that makes a difference.

    My other question is about Kodachromes in grey cardboard mounts with a red border. I have 4 like that in the first collection I mentioned, and I guess they are earlier than the ones in white mounts with the red and yellow Kodak graphic in the corner. What year did that change?

    Many thanks

    Kevin
    I have a bunch from the '50s with dates printed on them.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    I have a bunch from the '50s with dates printed on them.
    Ah, so much for that theory. Back then I imagine there were lots of places you could get Kodachrome processed, and some of them must have had slide mounting machines that printed the date and some didn't.

    By the way, I've got some from 1962 in white cardboard mounts with a blue border, printed with Kodak Ready-Mount. Does anyone know if those are likely to be Ektachrome?

    Kevin

  5. #15
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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    This might not be a fair comparison. In 1960, Kodachrome was the established process and E-6 was the newcomer. By then the film, chemicals and processing for Kodachrome were perfect. Not so for Ektachrome. I have nothing quite that old, but some of my Ektachromes from the 80's look as good as when they were shot. And of course, my dad's Kodachromes from the 50's still look good.
    Then again, Kodachrome was a pretty new thing back in the 40s. Yet, unlike Ektachromes from the 60s and 70s, Kodachromes from the 40s still look good.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pupfish View Post
    Most modern testing comparisons indicate that at least the slow to medium speed Ektachrome and Fujichrome emulsions now have dark storage archiving that's no longer shamed by a severe trouncing from Kodachrome anymore. Too, most all E6 films have projector-cycle/ bright storage lifetimes exceeding Kodachrome projection/bright storage life-- some by a substantial margin.
    Fuji doesn't seem to feel so confident about the longevity of their E6. In fact, they recommend refrigerated storage for anything beyond 25 years. As for projection lifetime, I have really seen no proof of the superiority of E6 vs K14. And until I do, I consider this to be nothing more than rumor.
    Last edited by StorminMatt; 03-07-2009 at 06:51 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Antony View Post
    Very useful, thank you. The slides I mentioned say they were processed by Kodak and are just like the ones shown on that page from 1955 to '58. Most of my undated collection is made up of the white/yellow/red types and they are Kodachrome, not Kodachrome II (which I understand was introduced in 1961), so that ties up with the royal visit to Naples in '61.

    If anyone is interested, here is one of those on Flickr, dining at sea on board the MV Fair Sea, and here is the Queen in her Rolls.



    Kevin

  8. #18

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    IIRC, Kodachrome slides used to (maybe still) in processing have a lacquer overcoating as a final step, which would seal the film against environmental vapors contacting the emulsion. No Ektachrome has this. I think, from my own Ektachrome processing from the mid-1960's to the present, that with Ektachrome Process E-4, the films started exhibiting more stable dyes. I have many images made on Ektachrome E-4 films that are just fine, but I never put them in slide pages that had problems.

  9. #19
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    /me clears her throat:

    Kodachrome. FTW. \m/

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