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  1. #11

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    So what are most people using Portra 800 for?

  2. #12
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    I read somewhere on APUG that overexposing color negative film some would push all the usable data up the curve into a usable area making WB easier regardless of light.

    Would using an 800 speed daylight film, exposing an extra stop then just balancing the color at printing be workable here?
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #13
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    Mark;

    This does not work. Ctein has an excellent explanation of it in one of his books. I believe this is covered with print examples in "Post Exposure".

    Basically, exposing a daylight negative film to tungsten light causes a bad mismatch in curves leading to bad results. Sorry. You need to use correction filtration to move between illuminants.

    Another myth sad to say.

    PE

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Mark;

    This does not work. Ctein has an excellent explanation of it in one of his books. I believe this is covered with print examples in "Post Exposure".

    Basically, exposing a daylight negative film to tungsten light causes a bad mismatch in curves leading to bad results. Sorry. You need to use correction filtration to move between illuminants.

    Another myth sad to say.

    PE
    I agree (and this is why I loved shooting 320T so much, even having to push it), but it can be done on neg. film with acceptable results. Acceptable, not laboratory perfect. Often (for me) there is no other option. I would not bother filtering an 800 daylight film for tungsten light, as it would simply make it too slow.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  5. #15

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    The Fujicolor amateur negative films from 100 to 1600 ASA (CN, CA, CH, CZ, and CU) are in general insensitive to the color shift by incandescent (tungsten) illumination. That may have been the reason why the 800 speed film has been so popular in photojournalism. Tungsten light is reproduced visually correct, and grain is similar to other brands' 200 ASA films.

    Portra 800 gets a strong yellow to red color cast, similar to slide film.

  6. #16
    AgX
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    Concerning cine films there are tungsten films with 500 ASA.

  7. #17
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    I used to like the Scotch (3M) 640T film, grainy but good speed wise. Now I would use Fuji 800 Press and correct digitally.
    Mark

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Mark;

    This does not work. Ctein has an excellent explanation of it in one of his books. I believe this is covered with print examples in "Post Exposure".

    Basically, exposing a daylight negative film to tungsten light causes a bad mismatch in curves leading to bad results. Sorry. You need to use correction filtration to move between illuminants.

    Another myth sad to say.

    PE
    Thanks PE
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #19

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    PE: what do you mean by 'swing' layers?

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray View Post
    PE: what do you mean by 'swing' layers?
    The layer which determines speed, which is based on the maxium energy output of the light source.

    For a tungsten balanced film, red is the highest output level of the 3 spectral regions, and red is the swing layer from which the other 2 have to be measured.

    This is true of color paper and is how they adjust the paper to use only red filtration. Ciba/Ilfochrome is daylight balanced and used M + C filtration as a result, no yellow.

    So, with a daylight film in tungsten, you use a blue filter and with a tungsten film in daylight you use an orange filter.

    PE

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