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  1. #21
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rossawilson1 View Post
    That's great, I didn't realise there were Ilfochrome machines.. thank you! I'll keep my eye out, though do you know if a durst printo will do the job? They seem to be more readily available.

    I thought that might be the case wogster.. I was going to get an old army petrol tank and dump them all in that but now I think I'll keep them separated. Thanks for the heads up.
    The issue with a single tank would be mixing acids and alkalies, if your somewhere that doesn't get freezing weather you might be able to keep your storage tank outside. One suggestion though, you need to clearly label such a tank, I would affix the words "spent photographic chemicals". Keep a log of all chemicals you put in the tank and how much, if there were a fire or other emergency at your home, you want the local fire brigade to know what they are dealing with. Also check local laws, keeping and transporting a tank that contains hazardous materials may be illegal without a special permit. The limit here in Canada is 500kg, over that you need placards on the vehicle and a permit from the ministry of transportation to transport it. I think it's the same in the US.
    Laws in the UK may be different and have different limitations.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  2. #22

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    Well if you leave the tank open, most or all the water will evaporate and you will only have some dry crystals in the bottom. Much easier to dispose of in the garbage than a large tank of mostly water. Use a plastic rain barrel, an old steel petrol tank will rust and leak.

  3. #23
    rossawilson1's Avatar
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    Thanks for the tips, obviously I need to put a little more thought into this..

  4. #24

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    I did RA4 processing in trays, with no temperature control. I used Paterson's room-temperature developer, which has since been discontinued. The Tetenal Mono kit is an existing alternative, but more expensive. IIRC, Photo Engineer has said that using Kodak's much cheaper chemicals, intended for machine processing at higher temperatures, should work fine too. The time in the developer needs to be exactly timed for color consistency. My times were around 60-90 seconds, IIRC.

    The trickiest bit of the process is judging color, because wet prints have a blue cast to them. In the end, this is what made me go to a rental lab instead, but it's not an insurmountable obstacle. I've heard that immersing the prints in undiluted b/w fix will remove the color cast.

  5. #25

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    Even cibachrome prints have a color cast (usually red) when wet, so for all my test prints I use a hand held hair drier to dry the print fully to judge color.

  6. #26
    rossawilson1's Avatar
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    I don't find the blue cast an issue as it only really shows up in the blacks, the colour casts that are the problem are the ones in the highlights, I say problem but it's all part of the fun..

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-D659 View Post
    Well if you leave the tank open, most or all the water will evaporate and you will only have some dry crystals in the bottom. Much easier to dispose of in the garbage than a large tank of mostly water. Use a plastic rain barrel, an old steel petrol tank will rust and leak.
    Those Crystals are still hazardous waste, some chemicals that are not terribly dangerous as liquids can be extremely toxic as a dry powder that can become air borne and inhaled. A plastic rain barrel may not be made of a plastic that can handle chemicals. One really needs a chemical proof plastic container. Check with chemical supply companies, they may have containers that were used to ship chemicals to them that
    hold larger volumes of liquids. An open container should have a cover, best would be a lid made of chicken wire over a layer of window screening, to keep kids and animals out of the container. Last thing you need is to find the bones of the neighbours kid or the dog in the bottom of your chemical storage tank.....

    Now, most photographic chemicals should play nice together, and are not that dangerous, although concentrate bottles that have a little bit in them, should be filled with water before being added to a tank. I would keep any tank down to about 25L so that it's light enough to transport. If you really want the powder idea, then you should have a tank, with a valve that allows small amounts to drain into a large pan, say a drop a second, so that there isn't a lot of liquid to evaporate at any one time. The pan should be lined with a chemical proof plastic bag, that is large enough that once in a while you can tie the top, and take it to the hazardous waste depot.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  8. #28
    rossawilson1's Avatar
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    "Last thing you need is to find the bones of the neighbors kid or the dog in the bottom of your chemical storage tank..... "

    Now that would be bothersome!

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by rossawilson1 View Post
    "Last thing you need is to find the bones of the neighbors kid or the dog in the bottom of your chemical storage tank..... "

    Now that would be bothersome!
    Yes, especially when local constabulary shows up to cart you off to the gaol while the
    the crown prosecutor decides whether they want to assign blame.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  10. #30
    rossawilson1's Avatar
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    I was thinking more about the mess I'd have to clean up! :-)

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