Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,901   Posts: 1,584,420   Online: 778
      
Page 6 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 81
  1. #51
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,544
    Images
    65
    Guys, dont forget that a wash after the fix is essential! Then photo flo, but no rinse!

    PE

  2. #52
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,988
    Images
    226

    Kodachrome as B&W Neg

    Quote Originally Posted by falotico View Post
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/consu...s/pdf/ae31.pdf

    My apologies again. I definitely am NOT posting blank posts, but I seem to have stumbled into a computer syntax error with this web address. If you can read it then copy it and paste it into the address line at google. Then click on the item "Printing Color Films as Black and White". This should bring up the Kodak document. The web address reads out in longhand as: www dot kodak dot com backslash global backslash en backslash consumer backslash products backslash pdf ae31 dot pdf

    Otherwise, try a google search for the title of the Kodak document, "Printing Color Films Developed as Black-and-White". Hope it works!
    I can see this one, it happens thanks for the new link


    ~Stone

    Mamiya: 7 II, RZ67 Pro II / Canon: 1V, AE-1, 5DmkII / Kodak: No 1 Pocket Autographic, No 1A Pocket Autographic | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #53

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1

    Kodakchrome as B&W

    It's funny I was in Washington, DC visiting a photolab and a customer asked this very question. I know one place you can have this processed but he will not give out the procedure. Edgar Praus Productions in Rochester, NY.

  4. #54
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,544
    Images
    65
    It is very simple to do as has been said before.

    PE

  5. #55
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,988
    Images
    226
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    It is very simple to do as has been said before.

    PE
    Easy for you to say, I'm really confused by this "bleach" step, because the kodak instructions to get rid of the yellow layer say...


    1. Prepare the bleach bath by dissolving 1 ounce (28 g) ofKODAK Citric Acid (Anhydrous) in 1 gallon (4 L) ofKODAK Rapid Fixer diluted as recommended for filmsin the fixer instructions.





    So is that all bleach is? Fixer and Citric Acid? If this is actually true, I both feel really happy that I've learned this, and really frustrated that no one said this to me before... also, why in color processing then is there a separate "Fix" step after the bleach step, if the bleach step itself contains fixer anyway?

    I wish you people would call each bleach step something different depending on which process it is and stop calling it bleach since I still think of bleach as clorox... lol you people (photo chemists) drive me batty!

  6. #56
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,544
    Images
    65
    Stone, read the whole Kodak article. This is a special bleach for the yellow silver filter layer and that is it. It is NOT a regular color bleach or blix.

    PE

  7. #57
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,988
    Images
    226
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Stone, read the whole Kodak article. This is a special bleach for the yellow silver filter layer and that is it. It is NOT a regular color bleach or blix.

    PE
    Thanks for confirming, and I did read it, I know the "old guys" don't understand but the "bleach" can be very confusing from process to process for anyone who didn't grow up on it.


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #58
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,544
    Images
    65
    Yes, some newbies even think that household bleach is similar but it is not. In fact, in most cases, household bleach will remove the emulsion from the film support.

    PE

  9. #59
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,988
    Images
    226
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Yes, some newbies even think that household bleach is similar but it is not. In fact, in most cases, household bleach will remove the emulsion from the film support.

    PE
    Except polaroid negs which you do use household bleach on see ... so confusing... haha

    I'm going to make a website with formulas once I get this all down, and charge $5 per year for access and it will all be in once place...

  10. #60

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Burnaby, BC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    635
    Any progress to report on your efforts to process Kodachrome, StoneNYC? The reason I ask? I found another 18 rolls of KM and KR inside a Tupperware container when cleaning out/defrosting my deep-freeze. Curiosity may lead me to try my hand...
    An assortment of F-series Nikons (F to F6, excluding the F4) with quite a few Nikkors, a pair of M6s with some Leitz glass, a pair of 500c/ms with a wide range of Zeiss optics and, just to help keep Duracell solvent, a D800.

    Favourite films: (1). KE ("Kodachrome Era"): 35mm: PKM25 and PKR64, HP5/Tri-X; 120: PKR64, PanF, FP4. (2). PKE ("Post-Kodachrome Era"): (a) 35mm: E100G, HP5 Plus/Tri-X and Delta 3200; (b) 120: E100G, PanF Plus, FP4 Plus, TMax 100.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin