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Thread: Fiber Paper

  1. #31
    Jeremy's Avatar
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    I haven't previously kept printing records, but I also haven't seriously printed any of my images. As I'm planning to spend more time and effort in the darkroom once this this academic year is over I will be creating my own record sheets.

    An additional question (which probably needs its own post) is what kind of/if any records to you make/keep of the initial negative exposure? I have taken to writing the date and developer on my print file sleeves, but don't doing anything beyond that.
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

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  2. #32

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    I keep detailed records of every image that I anticipate reprinting...I include the size, paper grade, developer, time of development/details of developer(s), date of last printing, burning, and dodging times and contrast grades if applicable .

    As I change sizes from 8X10 to 11X14 or 16X20 etc. I update my records to include the new size and all pertinant data relating to the new size. I didn't do that for a long time. I have since found that I don't have the time to do the whole shebang all over again every time that I print.

    Insofar as records on exposures. I keep records of number and date of exposure, SBR or low and high values if spot metering, indicated development time, lens, aperture, filter/filter factor, and shutter speed. This allows me to catch any discrepencies before they become epidemic.

  3. #33
    Ole
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    I'm terrible at keeping notes. I have tried, but then every once a while...

    Last week I tried repeating a print I last made in 1994, but on a different paper, to a different size. I remembered there was a lot of burning on this neg, something like eight separate steps for up to three full stops. Of cours the notes I meticulously made are probably on the bottom of one of the boxes in the attic - I don't know, since I didn't bother to search for them.

    Put the neg in the enlarger, adjusted the size. Had a good look at it. Measured the highlights and shadows with my EM10, referred to my paper speed table.

    Put a sheet of paper in the easel. 8 seconds base exposure, burn one stop there, burn 1½ stops there, a little bit there, "close" the edges by one stop, touch up that corner, add a little to the sky... Then into the developer.

    No it wasn't identical to the old print. I'd say it was better
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  4. #34
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blansky
    Lee, I'm surprised you don't keep notes.
    I keep date, exposure#, paper, size,...
    .... months later, I could get exactly the same or very close. It sure takes less time than starting over from the beginning.
    I wonder what everyone else does.
    I also keep extensive records. Rarely... possibly, one or two percent of these will actually be useful in the future ... but when they are needed they are a blessing. They are *most* useful for the images where the Color Analyzer could not really be used; an example would be - a photograph taken by someone else, on a local beach, shortly after dawn - on Kodak "Gold 200" - a film I don't use.

    With *no* idea of where the color balance should be - I happened to "hit" a proper balance on the fourth trial print - that is called "luck". I'll carve this information in stone, with a chisel, if need be - in case another print is requested.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  5. #35
    David Ruby's Avatar
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    I'm starting to take notes now too. I use a cheap notebook from the grocery store. For each session I note the date, the negative sleeve number (so I can find that neg again), the f-stop, size of print (instead of enlarger height which would probably be better!), filter used, and the time.

    Since I'm really learning as I go, I make numerous prints and note each of them. Once I get a base print I then start messing with it a bit. Lately, I work until I get a base print then wait a few days so I can stare at it hanging on the wall for awhild. Then I look to crop or burn/dodge it as needed to help it. Then I can make notes.

    I used to make notes on the print but always forgot since I could't do it when they were wet and didn't do it at a later time. This seems to work for now.

    For those who take great notes, is the reason just so you can save time later, or do some (or most) of you also print as business as opposed to a hobby (reprints etc.)?

  6. #36
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    David:

    I don't think it matters if you are amateur or pro. Taking notes saves tons of time. Also, lets say you toned a print, and you like the look, and want to duplicate the look a few months later. The notes tell you what paper you used, what brand ( they all tone differently) what toner and even what developer.

    As I've stated before Zonal Pro warmtone developer gives a nice warmtone print with ILMG FB WT after it has been toned in selenuim. If I didn't originally make notes it may take a while and a lot of paper to figure it out again.

    When using different developers and papers there are so many variations that you can never remember them.

    Also burning and dodging. Extensive notes can save tons of time and money.

    My advice set up a system, maybe like the sheet I mentioned previously, stick to it and it will save you untold time and money. Besides it only takes a few seconds to do.

    Michael McBlane

  7. #37

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    I keep a running set of notes or logs in spiral notebooks as I work in the darkroom. they contain information on printing, developing film, film tests, paper and developer tests etc. I also include notes on problems solutions etc. i have about 20 of these and it is fun to look through the ones from about 10 years ago and see how much I have learned.


    After I get a print or a couple variations of a print done, I will take one dried print and transfer all information to the back. Paper, developer and dilution, exposure, times, filter, enlarger height, negative # etc. On the print side I will use a marker to show areas that need dodging and burning and related +or- Fstops.

    I also have a set of "template" negatives that i have used for several years to test paper, developers, toners, bleaching techniques, flashing etc. I have a couple of binders with about 60 prints with various combos of paper, developer, toner etc. I just make it a point if I try something new that I always make a print from that negative first thing.

  8. #38

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    I keep a running set of notes or logs in spiral notebooks as I work in the darkroom. they contain information on printing, developing film, film tests, paper and developer tests etc. I also include notes on problems solutions etc. i have about 20 of these and it is fun to look through the ones from about 10 years ago and see how much I have learned.


    After I get a print or a couple variations of a print done, I will take one dried print and transfer all information to the back. Paper, developer and dilution, exposure, times, filter, enlarger height, negative # etc. On the print side I will use a marker to show areas that need dodging and burning and related +or- Fstops.

    I also have a set of "template" negatives that i have used for several years to test paper, developers, toners, bleaching techniques, flashing etc. I have a couple of binders with about 60 prints with various combos of paper, developer, toner etc. I just make it a point if I try something new that I always make a print from that negative first thing.

  9. #39

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    As several posters have indicated, keeping notes can be very helpful in saving both time and money. When printing, I just use a Sharpie pen and summarize exposure/paper/lens/enlarger height/filter/burning/dodging data on the back of the contact sheet--another good reason for having contact sheets.
    In addition, with some tricky subjects (night shots especially) I put the critical data on the edge of the film so that I can easily refer to it for a potential similar subject in the future. There's not a lot of blank space on the edge of 4 x 5 film, but there's enough for date, lens used, developer, time of development, exposure time and f-stop. Just use India ink and a fine-tipped pen. Sharpies won't work well for this; the ink is not opaque enough to read easily on the contact sheet.
    I also use the India ink/pen for basic data on 35mm and roll film. Usually there's enough blank space at one end of the roll or the other to write on.

    Konical

  10. #40
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    I like the sound of your print drying method. Do you dry mount your prints or are they flat enough from this drying method to hinge to the mat?
    Quote Originally Posted by Annemarieke
    David,
    I use mostly fiber paper, because I love it so much and there is a lot more tone between white and black than in RC paper. I use RC paper only to proof print.

    For drying I use sheets of glass on which I tape the fiber prints with 'water colour tape' (paper tape that sticks when wet). I leave an extra wide white border in order to be able to stick them down with the tape (overlap of about 2 cm).

    However, I don't stick the prints down immediately, but wait approximately half an hour after I have smoothed the prints down on the glass plate with a shammy. This is to avoid that the paper rips the tape (fiber paper is stronger than tape, and also shrinks whilst drying), and curling like h***!

    Good luck!
    Anne Marieke
    What is "Art"? Art is what I decide it is!

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