Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,328   Posts: 1,537,120   Online: 899
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    39

    Exposing Pro 160S

    At the end of this week, I am heading out on a backpacking trip to the Gila National Forest in New Mexico. I'm bringing a few films (Velvia, APX400, PX125, and the 160S), but I have a pretty good idea of how to work with all of them except the 160S. Is that a film I should go for box speed from, or will I get better results at 125 or 100? I know these are matters of taste, but I would appreciate any thoughts anyone has. I usually overexpose my black and white, but I don't shoot much color (and what I do is usually something strange like a cross process or redscale).
    I also realize that 160S is probably a poorer choice than 160C for landscapes. I actually thought I had 160C in the freezer- apparently I mislabeled it. I guess we'll see what happens with the S.
    Photoblog, though I'll warn you it's only mostly analog.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Westminster, Maryland, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,504
    I rate all my Fuji Pro 160S ISO at a 1/3 stop slower. The little overexposure seems to work for me.

    I shoot the 8x10 version. This is a gallery all shot on 160S (except the portraits): http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Cheers..._County.html#0
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Baltimore, MD., USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    230
    Yes, this is a matter of taste. I print all of my color negatives as I do not have a Nikon 9000 (yet). I prefer to expose the 160 S between 100 and 125. It gives me better shadow detail than box speed and I have little fear of blowing out any highlights. You should see the same benefit for a slight over exposure shooting color negatives as you do shooting black & white.

    Just a note, I started shooting the 160 C and was quite happy with it. I picked a pack of the 160 S out of curiosity and was also quite pleased. I now shoot more of the "S" than the "C." In many cases, I find the "C" just a bit too snappy and saturated for my taste.

    I prefer printing a thicker negative, but I don't know if this will effect the scanning process.

  4. #4
    MikeSeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Prospect (Louisville), KY, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,062
    I've shot 160S both at box speed and at 100. I don't see a lot of difference, truth be told, reflecting the latitude this film has. It is a forgiving film and quite beautiful.

    Thomas's experience almost exactly parallels mine with this film; the "S" is now my default "slow" color neg film. I find its saturation and "snappiness" (good word Thomas!) to be intermediate between my old standards, the Portra NC and VC films. I think it's a bit more "neutral" than those two, themselves fine films otherwise. I tried a few rolls of the 160C and it didn't grab me.

    For simplicity's sake I've standardized on the 160S and the 400H as my everyday C41 films; I keep Portra VC's on hand in both speeds for when I want a bit more punch (like with the endless slate gray days we've had lately---my SAD is kicking in!). I used to be a Portra NC fan, but now find it too blah and wan for my liking in most cases, and it's too much hassle to keep a slew of different films on hand. All of these do a nice job with skin tones as well.

    I'm eager to give Ektar 100 a try in 120 when it's out next month, just as another option. Not a fan of aggressively saturated colors, so we'll see how that goes.

    Scanning and other digital operations are strictly off limits here, so I'll just say that with the 9000 you'll likely find that a bit thinner negative is preferred over a thicker one, which is opposite what is often desired for optical printing.
    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    39
    I'm glad to hear people have had good experiences with 160S for a variety of applications. I think the Velvia I'll be carrying will pack plenty of saturation and "snap" for desert landscapes (apparently we're getting a full moon on Wednesday), so a slightly more natural negative film will probably be a nice complement. I've only ever shot slide film for cross processing, so my plan for the Velvia is to bracket aggressively. I only paid $2 a roll (it's just a tad "vintage"), so I will bring a few rolls and use them liberally. I also threw some old Elite Chrome 400 in the bag, but that will probably get cross processed.
    Photoblog, though I'll warn you it's only mostly analog.

  6. #6
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    It all depends on how you meter and the luminance range of the scene...not to mention your printing paper (or whether or not you want to scan). The reason lots of people have better results at a lower EI setting is because they don't have the time (or sometimes the ability...) to carefully expose, and being a little over will not hurt the neg all that much. Other people do it deliberately because it lowers contrast. When using an incident meter or sunny 16, I rate it at 125, because I like to have an EI that matches a shutter speed, and the extra 1/3 stop will help to cover any slop that my brain introduces. If it is a contrasty scene, I don't rerate; I just manually overexpose for that one shot. When using a spot meter, I use EI 160 and usually place a tone to decide an exposure.

    Additionally, don't be afraid to push or pull your E-6 films to alter contrast if necessary. They can handle this far better than C-41 films. I pull E-6 almost every time I use one of the slower speed emulsions (and usually push 400X). I have had very good results pulling Velvia 100F two stops; couldn't even tell it was pulled based on the color. I believe one stop is the most I have pulled Velvia 50. I don't know that film very well, but it might handle two.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 03-05-2009 at 09:57 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  7. #7
    jd callow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Milan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,002
    Images
    117
    I rate 160s between 80 and 100. 80 is where I generally shoot the film. There aren't many, if any, colour negative films that are not better at half box speed. The nature of colour neg films are such that they respond with better colour, apparent increase of sharpness and you'll utilize a greater amount of the film's tonal range when exposed at 1/2 box. The box speed can be considered the upper limit for a good neg from a given film.

    FWIW I carefully meter and expose my film.
    Last edited by jd callow; 03-05-2009 at 10:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.

    *

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    39
    News flash:

    I stopped by my local shop today and picked up sixteen expired (but frozen since new) rolls of higher-end color negative films for $20 (100UC, 400UC, NPZ, Portra 800, Pro 800Z which actually hasn't even expired yet), and I think I'm going to ditch the 160S for 100UC and a roll of Portra 800 (for campfires and whatnot, and also to justify a hand inspection if things get ugly with the TSA boys in Killadelphia).

    I think this makes more sense- 100UC seems much more landscape oriented, and I'll save my stash of 160S for when I play around with natural-light portraiture in the spring. Warn me if I'm being foolish, but it looks like I'll be carrying:

    APX 400 (2x24)
    PX 125 (1x36- not great results so far but deserves another chance)
    Velvia 50 (2x36- apparently unforgiving but only one way to learn!)
    100UC (2x36)
    Portra 800 (1x36)

    I've pondered how much film to bring pretty extensively, and I think this is a good amount for a five-day trip. To be honest, I'll be amazed if I shoot all of this, and I'd rather bring some home unexposed than run out when I really want it. I tried to budget for each application- 36 exposures of 800Z should be plenty for "campfire" type shooting, while I have 144 exposures of bright color stuff (100UC and Velvia) for landscapes and such. I know I'll get better results from the black and white (more experiece with it plus how forgiving it is to all sorts of mishandling), but I really want to start experimenting with color film now that my DSLR is sold. I've done some cross-process and other weird stuff, but one of these days I'm going to want pretty colors and I'm going to want to know how to do it.
    Photoblog, though I'll warn you it's only mostly analog.

  9. #9
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    I'd definitely take the 160s along to the desert. Don't forget that you can get very contrasty lighting out there, and 160s will be able to handle it.

    Velvia 50... I don't know, I'd be concerned what it will do with desert highlights (my choice is velvia 100 and astia 100F and i've also had good results with provia 100F and 400x, but v50 is not a particular friend of mine). Well, just experiment and enjoy yourself and report back to us

    Incidentally, I shoot 160s at box speed if people are in the scene or 125 if not and if I want a bit more definition in the colours. Just bracket and all will be clear when you print the negs.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    39
    Unfortunately, the flu has forced me to cancel my travel plans. I still appreciate all the advice (I still have the film, so it will still be put to good use eventually).

    I found some expired Sensia yesterday for $3 and I'm hoping cross processing it will make me feel better about being stuck here instead of out in the desert.
    Photoblog, though I'll warn you it's only mostly analog.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin