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  1. #11

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    I use an incident meter, and go from there. The biggest thing I find with C41 color film is not to underexpose. It will become horribly grainy, and the colors will be off. If you have to err, make sure to overexpose.

  2. #12

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    Color negative film has good latitude. Use the meter and metering technique that has worked for you with whatever films you previously used, and you will probably get good results. You might just treat it the same as black and white, at least for starters. (You can't adjust the contrast by development changes - at least not much - but otherwise it works about the same.)

  3. #13
    mts
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    I get the best results using center-weighted metering. I try to pick up and hold the exposure for the shadows, but I usually bracket exposures -1,0,+1 stop just to be sure. There is a lot more latitude in color negative than in reversal film, so I usually bracket E-6 films 1/2 stop instead of the full stop. You can play with contrast in E-6 by adjusting the first developer, but you will have to scratch-mix your chemistry to control your results.
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  4. #14

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    At least for starters, expose for the shadows and don't worry about it.

    The Kodak color neg emulsions that I've mostly been using (Portra 400NC and Ultra Max 400) have enough latitude that when I work with meterless cameras I've been doing fine just winging it.

  5. #15

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    Will someone please explain what expose for the shadows means?

    Do you take a spot reading of the shadow and then shift it several "zones" below middle gray. Or are you setting the camera for the reading that you get in a shadow area? Or are you taking an incident reading in a shady area?

  6. #16
    mts
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    I generally meter the shadow area and use this exposure reading for color negative. There is enough latitude to over exposure that highlights are still recorded. Reversal film is more difficult owing to its reduced latitude. It is quite easy to blow out highlights and/or to lose shadow detail so you should decide what part of the scene is most important, meter for it, and then bracket exposures to be sure.
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  7. #17

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    How about the Chromazone exposure system? Any user here?

    http://photo.net/nature-photography-forum/001avQ

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jd callow View Post
    It also has excellent reciprocity characteristics.
    I have never used 160NC for nighttime work, so really know nothing about its reciprocity behaviour. I am going to have a play with some tonight (in 120). Planning to rate at 80, and I expect an incident metered time of about 2mins. Do you reckon bracketing at, say, 4mins, 6mins and 8mins would be a reasonable first-time strategy? Thanks for your thoughts.
    Ian

  9. #19

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    I usually use Fuji but how I expose the color films has a lot to do with what the subject is. Avoiding color shifts is more important for portraits. Overexposing the shadows up to a stop for portraits is fine. For nature or street scenes overexposing the shadows 1-3 stops would usually be fine.

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