Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,875   Posts: 1,520,225   Online: 1188
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Tacoma, WA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    560
    Good point about using hybrid techniques. It probably would result in less overall quality loss. I'm not excited about calibrating my printer to print digital negatives though.

  2. #12
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Fort Wayne, Indiana
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    954
    Quote Originally Posted by StorminMatt View Post
    Not necessarily. There is such a thing as B+W reversal paper. And I have seen it in the Freestyle catalog. Of course,I have never used it. But it would seem that one less duplication step would result in better quality.
    Cool, I'd never seen that. Need to dust off my Freestyle catalog!
    Chris Crawford
    Fine Art Photography of Indiana and other places no one else photographs.

    http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

    My Tested Developing Times with the films and developers I use

    Become a fan of my work on Facebook

    Fort Wayne, Indiana

  3. #13
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Fort Wayne, Indiana
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    954
    Quote Originally Posted by domaz View Post
    Good point about using hybrid techniques. It probably would result in less overall quality loss. I'm not excited about calibrating my printer to print digital negatives though.
    If you intend your final output to be traditional silver prints, I'd probably not bother with scanning and making a digital neg to print from. I think the process of making an interneg in the darkroom would be easier. I've read up on making digital negs because it looks like a cool way to make repeatable silver prints from images that need a lot of dodging and burning (you do all that in photoshop and the digital neg will have all that set in it), but the process of getting an inkjet to produce a negative with the correct tonality looks very hard. If I were you I would only consider doing scanning if you want to make digital final prints, or if the slides are damaged and need work to remove scratches or embedded dust.
    Chris Crawford
    Fine Art Photography of Indiana and other places no one else photographs.

    http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

    My Tested Developing Times with the films and developers I use

    Become a fan of my work on Facebook

    Fort Wayne, Indiana

  4. #14
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    An easy but slightly expensive way to do this is to scan and have an LVT made (e.g. at Chicago Albumen). The LVT negs are easier to work with than digital negs... to do digital negs right, you need to deduce the correct curves for your combination of paper, light source, ink type etc. If you have an LVT made, you can just tell them what your output will be (e.g. silver or Pt/Pd or whatever) and that's that. LVTs have *far* high resolution than inkjetted digital negs, won't give any banding at all, and can actually be enlarged considerably. The LVT can then be stored like a normal neg for reprinting later.

    I used to be enthused about digital negs but now the only thing I use them for is cyanotypes. For silver they basically suck, in my experience. LVT is far better for silver, in my experience. (Mind you this is one of those things that I say knowing full well that somebody will follow up with "didn't you try this and this and this" and my answer is no, I don't feel like I was put on this earth to dick around ad nauseum with computers. I'll happily pay an LVT lab to do the dicking for me and give me a much higher quality result.)

    Still... the cheapest and least computery solution of all is simply to dupe to tmax or such, it's very easy, can give excellent results, costs next to nothing... and doesn't involve photoshop or such.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  5. #15
    Chazzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    South Bend, IN, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,839
    Images
    5
    If I enlarge a slide onto sheet film to make a negative, do I need to invert the slide to keep from getting reversed directions on the negative?
    Charles Hohenstein

  6. #16
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Yep. Just realize that you want the emulsion side of your b&w dupe to go face down onto your paper, if you want to contact print. If you're enlarging the b&w neg for the print then it won't matter. But IMHO the biggest feature of this slide -> b&w workflow is being able to produce a *large* b&w neg for contact printing.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  7. #17
    adamc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    54
    Images
    29
    I am interested in doing this with 4x5.
    I have 4x5 E6 images and 4x5 B&W film, I'll be using the negs for contact printing alt processes. In my mind it seems pretty easy...I'm thinking all I'd need to do is sandwich the positive e6 and the B&W emulsion to base, do some test strips, and develop like normal. Has anybody out there tried this, and if so is there anything I should be aware of?

    Thanks,
    Adam

  8. #18
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,695
    Images
    23
    Why don't you just get some black and white reversal paper to print the slides in black and white?
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  9. #19
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by adamc View Post
    I am interested in doing this with 4x5.
    I have 4x5 E6 images and 4x5 B&W film, I'll be using the negs for contact printing alt processes. In my mind it seems pretty easy...I'm thinking all I'd need to do is sandwich the positive e6 and the B&W emulsion to base, do some test strips, and develop like normal. Has anybody out there tried this, and if so is there anything I should be aware of?

    Thanks,
    Adam
    Yes, it works well. Is your b&w film panchromatic?
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  10. #20
    adamc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    54
    Images
    29
    Panchromatic = yes

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin