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  1. #1

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    Make a B&W negative from a color slide

    I have a few Color Slides I would like to try printing in B&W. I can't seem to find much on copying a slide to a B&W negative. Can anyone recommend a way to do it? My first though was to put the slide in my enlarger, figure out the enlarging "on" time I should use from a spot meter, and then expose the sheet and develop it normally. Or is it more complicated than that?

  2. #2

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    Good Afternoon, Domaz,

    That's the basic approach. For details, use Forum Search. I recall a thread on the topic not too long ago.

    Konical

  3. #3
    keithwms's Avatar
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    It's that simple. Yes, do a search. I do this quite often. You can put a piece of paper over a test sheet of film and withdraw it to nail down the exposure. I use tmax as the b&w film and it works well; you'll want to use a pan film or your tones will go awry.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  4. #4

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    Scan it! Very simple.

    Analog methods are more difficult, and give less quality.

    Go ask your question on the hybrid forum.

    Sandy King


    Quote Originally Posted by domaz View Post
    I have a few Color Slides I would like to try printing in B&W. I can't seem to find much on copying a slide to a B&W negative. Can anyone recommend a way to do it? My first though was to put the slide in my enlarger, figure out the enlarging "on" time I should use from a spot meter, and then expose the sheet and develop it normally. Or is it more complicated than that?

  5. #5

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    Yes, scan in color and convert to b&w. But goto hybrid photo for more discussion.
    "Get over it."

  6. #6
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Buy a slide duplicator that fits on you camera, and load your camera with black and white film. You could also scan.........
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  7. #7
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    If he wants to do a digital print, scanning is great, but if he wants a traditional print then he'll need to make a neg. The enlarger method others have suggested works well if you want a large format negative. The slidee duplicator method if you want a 35mm neg.
    Chris Crawford
    Fine Art Photography of Indiana and other places no one else photographs.

    http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

    My Tested Developing Times with the films and developers I use

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    Fort Wayne, Indiana

  8. #8

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    Slide copier using B&W film...and you can get them cheap on e-prey. K

  9. #9
    Robert Brummitt's Avatar
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    This is what I use to do when working for a commercial lab.
    First, get a good mid tone B&W film 4x5 or 8x10. I used Ilford FP4.
    Second, do some contact exposure tests to get the best range. I used a Stouffer step scale. You can also do projected tests but I never found much differance in time and f stop. I believed I was projecting F16 @ 10 or 15 seconds. More likely less. 8 seconds. Third, process the film and compare what exposure gives you the best range. I used Kodak D76. Again, nothing wild normal development. You don't want to blow out high lights.
    I got some pretty good results.
    Later, you can experiment to you hearts content.
    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit"
    Aristotle

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by chriscrawfordphoto View Post
    but if he wants a traditional print then he'll need to make a neg.
    Not necessarily. There is such a thing as B+W reversal paper. And I have seen it in the Freestyle catalog. Of course,I have never used it. But it would seem that one less duplication step would result in better quality.

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