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  1. #1

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    Any definitive guides for bleach-bypass processing out there?

    Hi all, I was wondering if people here could share (preferably with pictures) their experiences with bleach bypass processing. It is something that I intend to to in the next few days, but I'm having a lot of problem trying to work out how it's done.

    There's lots of info about where it's been used in movie/film stocks etc, but I was wondering if anyone knows of a definitive guide for photographic stills... on the web somewhere?

    Maybe someone here has tried it?

    here's hoping

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    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Bleach bypass is exactly that. The normal color process, but no bleach. Usually a rinse or a stop bath of 1 - 2% acetic acid is used after the color developer. One then fixes the film or paper and then continues with the process.

    PE

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bohngy View Post
    Maybe someone here has tried it?
    Yes I've tried some. The caveat is that while cine stock uses remjet as antihalation layer, current still negs use either silver or some other means dependent on the bleach. So if the bleach is skipped the neg gets very dense. They might be hard to scan. Other than that its much like in mp - high contrast, low saturation and very grainy.

    The atachment is Gold 200 processed in C41 with no bleach. Not a good shot but its just for reference. I think the light was some diffused flash.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails f1000001.jpg  

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Domin View Post
    high contrast, low saturation and very grainy.

    .
    I made the mistake of bleach bypassing the king of bad grain... EL400.. lol

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    Hello peeps, thanks for the responses thusfar.
    Domin, your example is excellent - just the tonality I was dreaming of. I'm not so keen on the blown highlights and overly cyan or yellow of cross-processing. So Bleach bypass may be the way to go.
    Athiril, would you care to expand a bit more on your findings? If the grain is terrible I'll try it with 120 or maybe 4x5.
    One other point, I'm relatively new to C41 processing (done it only once before). How do I bypass the bleaching stage when I can only get hold of Blix - bleach and fix combined! Could I fix with Hypam (a non-hardening fixer?)
    thanks




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  6. #6
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    Hi,

    All you do is skip the bleach and wash, and use a stop bath and rinse (in the dark) instead, then continue as normal.

    The fun part is when you throw a b/w developer into the process in order to control the intensity of the effect. The b/w developer comes after the color developer. When you do this, you do not skip the bleach step; just insert the b/w developer (followed by a quick stop and rinse) in between the color developer and the bleach. What you do with the b/w step controls the intensity of the effect. You are doing this at C-41 temps, which are 25 to 32 F higher than standard b/w temps, so dilute the developer heavily, and experiment to find a good time. I used HC-110 at 1:127 at various times when I did it.

    Ron just corrected me. This is not actually "bleach bypass". It does have a similar effect, and does let you control the intensity by varying the details of the b/w step.

    The best guide for this is lots of trial and error, and good note taking and judgment skills. I don't know of an official guide...I learned about it in motion pictures in my intermediate film class, messed with it using still film in my experimental photography classes, and actually used it to effect in my advanced color photography class.

    As for doing it with blix...you can't...unless you do it with the b/w step. You need to look for the 757 mL bottle of Kodak Flexicolor Fixer and Replenisher. It makes a gallon, lasts 8 weeks or 120 rolls, and costs about $8 plus tax.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 04-04-2009 at 11:15 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  7. #7
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    2F;

    The bleach does remove silver developed by the B&W developer. It is there to remove all silver metal formed. In fact, that is the way E6 bleach works. It removes all silver. That is, unless you are using weak bleach somehow.

    What does happen, with a B&W developer after the color developer is to continue some color development and cross contamination and so you get higher dye density and contrast with bad color. This takes place in limited amount until the alkali and color developing agent are used up.

    PE

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    Can't you shorten the bleach time to get a smaller effect? If all you have is blix I wonder if you could shorten the blix time and then run normal fix to get full fixing.

    My impression is the whole process takes some trial and error to find what you want the end to result like.

  9. #9
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    2F;

    The bleach does remove silver developed by the B&W developer. It is there to remove all silver metal formed. In fact, that is the way E6 bleach works. It removes all silver. That is, unless you are using weak bleach somehow.

    What does happen, with a B&W developer after the color developer is to continue some color development and cross contamination and so you get higher dye density and contrast with bad color. This takes place in limited amount until the alkali and color developing agent are used up.

    PE
    OK. I changed the post so it was not wrong. Thank you. Based on the way it looks, I assumed that the b/w developer did something to the silver to make it insoluble in the bleach. Minus the technical details, it does let you fine tune the "bleach-bypass-like" effect, however. (I like it way better than a straight bleach bypass.)

    Do you have any idea what ENR means? That's what the MP industry calls it.

    I just did some Internet searching and found this article: http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...DJH0tAOyy9CkCg

    I never saw this movie. The article not only talks about ENR and bleach bypass, but about how and why the look for the film was controlled using analog methods. They did it on the prints as opposed to on the in-camera film.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 04-04-2009 at 11:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  10. #10
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    2F;

    ENR was the abbreviated name of a Kodak product for the MP industry in the 60s. That is all I can remember about that acronym. I don't know what it means. Maybe Eastman Negative Release? That is the closest I can come.

    PE

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